A+D
A+D Gallery
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chris_andthen.jpg

Chris Campe

Oh Sure, 2012 (detail)

handcut painted paper, collage

76 x 94 x 20 inches 

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Anne Vagt

Frauenliste, 2012

marker on paper

8.3 x 11.7 inches

 

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Deb Sokolow

Chapter 12. The Dairy Queen Employee Following You, 2011

graphite and acrylic on paper mounted to panel

30" x 22" x 1"

And Then She's Like/ And He Goes

Curated by Chris Campe

September 6th, 5-8 pm, Closing Reception and ColumbiaCrawl, a campus-wide evening of visual and performing arts.
6 pm: Gallery talk with the artists followed by a performance of 
The Wilhelm Scream by Jeff Kolar.

Participating artists include: Deb Sokolow, Mark Addison Smith, Tony Lewis, Anne Vagt, Mark Booth, Chris Campe, Jana Sotzko and Elen Flügge, and Jeff Kolar.

Someone is telling us that she said something and he answered—what we don’t know. What we do know: there are at least three people involved here: she, he, and the person telling us about their conversation. And actually, we are involved, too. It is up to us, the audience, to speculate what she said and he replied, or what she inquired and how he responded, or what she threw at him and what he retorted. Even though the content of the dialog is left out its colloquial language evokes distinct voices in our head and entices us to imagine what is going on. 

The exhibition And Then She’s Like/ And He Goes combines text-based visual art with language-based sound art to highlight the works’ multi-sensory appeal as a mode of storytelling. Seeing and reading text in an artwork involves hearing, even if only inside the viewers head, and listening to spoken words and sound involuntarily brings images to the mind‘s eye, even when the language is not straightforwardly descriptive. The artists examine these audible qualities of image-text and the visual potential of language and sound. Intertwining documentation and fabulation they give us audio/visual bits and pieces and use non-linear narrative to draw us into their stories. Rather than over the course of the traditional beginning, middle, and end the narrative comes alive in the overlap between word, image and sound. Although there is no way of knowing for sure what she said and he replied, the works in the show invite us to be involved in the story. 

This exhibition is sponsored by the Art + Design Department at Columbia College Chicago. This exhibition is partially supported by an Illinois Arts Council Grant, a state agency, and The Consulate General of the Federal Republic of Germany. Explore Germany, www.germany.info