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Columbia College Chicago
Katrina Andry
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Katrina Andry

August 22 - September 11, 2011

Stereotypes are well ingrained in our culture, and are used almost instinctively to deal with differences. Though, the byproduct of stereotypes is to create divisions between people, and establish an arbitrary set of societal norms that benefit the majority while disenfranchising others. For example, having a mullet may be socially acceptable to some, but is widely viewed as the hallmark of a red neck mentality. Therefore, having a mullet makes you ignorant, though hairstyle has no scientific bearing on levels of cognizance. Katrina Andry’s work challenges ideas about black people that were once backed by what was considered to be scientific research. While the academic rational behind them has disappeared, Andry examines how these stereotypes have persisted concealing the internal humanity of individuals. Through images of dreaming Andry allows personal uniqueness to resurface. Sleep allows for a temporary escape from the world around us. No matter where people are or what they’re doing (at work, a bar, a family dinner, or in the car) if they are tired enough, they will fall asleep. People make their immediate surroundings a place in which they escape from the implications of those very same surroundings. Andry’s work delves into duel unreality of perceptions and dreams, forcing viewers to confront their own thoughts through glimpsing the distinctions they hide in others.

 

men in jungle

The Jungle Bunny Lured You In And Gave You Fever. The Only Cure Is To Fuck That Bunny. She Wants It.
reduction woodcut and digital print
40" x 59 1/2"
2011

 

women with babies

Mammy Complex: Unfit Mommies Make For Fit Nannies
reduction woodcut and digital print
40" x 59 1/2"
2011