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Columbia College Chicago
Volume 1 Issue 1
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Volume 1 Issue 1


EDITORIAL STATEMENT
WITH VOLUME 1, Issue 1, our Editorial Collective is proud to launch Cultural Landscapes: A Cultural Studies Journal. Cultural Landscapes is an open-access, online academic journal of cultural studies based in the Cultural Studies Program at Columbia College Chicago.  The journal has a special commitment to publishing the work of undergraduate students, graduate students, and emerging scholars in the field of cultural studies.

CHARLES S. CASTLE

‘WHITE TRASH’ IDENTITIES, MEDIA, AND POPULAR CULTURE: REDEFINING WHITE HEGEMONY IN CONTEMPORARY AMERICAN CULTURE

Abstract
It is often claimed that the emergence of white trash culture and identity subverts and deconstructs white hegemony and privilege. The present article interrogates this commonly held view. It examines how the commodification of white trash culture, far from subverting white hegemony and white supremacy, in fact serves to secure and reproduce them in contemporary American culture.

GWENDOLYN BUTKUS

DOES LUNCH MATTER?

Abstract
This article examines some of the current food practices at American elementary schools as symptomatic of a larger eating disorder, associated with the increasing commodification of food.  Very little has been done to address the relationship of students with food.  Americans suffer chronic confusion over how and what to eat; we are constantly being bombarded with newly packaged food commodities and diets. We almost forget why we eat. What better place to start to address the “high costs” of our eating habits and what we can do to subvert them than our elementary schools.

LORA V. KOYCHEVA

GENDERS BEYOND POSITIVISM: CHOICES OF AVATARS, CHOICES OF SELVES

Abstract
This paper addresses the following question: “Is playing a computer game character with a gender different than one’s own self identified gender a sign for psychological androgyny?” I would like to argue here that the choice of avatar and character during computer game playing can be regarded as a drive for psychological androgyny. Further, the praxis of young adult gamers points not only at a self which practices its own metamorphosis as a way of negotiating ‘virtual’ versus ‘real,’ but is also a harbinger of a paradigm shift in contemporary U.S. culture (and perhaps more generally in Western culture). This paper will suggest that a metamorphic self re/writes and re/views itself during its use of avatar during game play, thus experiencing a different psychological reality than the one in which ‘serious’ daily activities are involved. Finally, is such praxis of moving beyond the essentialist equating of male with masculine and female with feminine symptomatic of moving beyond positivism more generally?

NOTES ON CONTRIBUTORS