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Columbia College Chicago
Volume 1 Issue 2
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Volume 1 Issue 2


EDITORIAL STATEMENT
The Editorial Collective of Cultural Landscapes: A Cultural Studies Journal is proud to present its readers with a second volume of some interesting work in Cultural Studies.  The present volume, like the first one, displays the journal's special and unwavering commitment to publishing the work of emerging scholars and student researchers in the field of contemporary cultural studies.

LINDSEY MCLEAN

EAT ME:  FOOD ADVERTISING  AND THE CONSTRUCTION OF FEMININE SUBJECTIVITIES IN CONTEMPORARY AMERICAN CULTURE

Abstract
In contemporary American culture, food advertising directed toward women routinely deploys language and imagery centering on issues of control, morality, agency, and labor that are articulated to dominant ideas, discourses, and practices surrounding the female body, roles of women and female sexuality.In this project, I examine the ways in which such rhetorical tropes in food related media (re)produce and even constitute feminine subjectivities and identities in contemporary culture. Drawing on semiotics and Foucault’s theories of objectification, I interrogate food advertisements in some recent women’s magazines to offer a symptomatic critique of the ways in which feminine identities are constituted through media texts and discourses.

ANITA SIMMONS 

BLACK WOMANHOOD, MISOGYNY, AND HIP-HOP CULTURE: A FEMINIST INTERVENTION

Abstract
This project examines the well-known phrase "Money is the root of all evil" in the context of the popular music genre, Hip-Hop.  The capitalist system was one of the driving forces behind the United States' system of chattel slavery, in which Euro-Americans abducted African people and brought them to the Americas by force.  But what does slavery have to do with misogyny in Hip-Hop?  I argue here that misogyny in Hip-Hop is not a new phenomenon.  One of the long-lasting legacies of U.S. slavery has been the institutionalization, in both white and black male cultures, of a hatred, fear, and mistrust of black women.  Hip-Hop's sexist lyrics are merely the contemporary form to express an anti-black-woman sentiment that has permeated U.S. cultural and social public discources and practices for centuries.

ABIGAIL FRITZ

DANCING FREEDOM:  ON THE MAKING AND APPROPIRATION OF FIRE DANCE IN CONTEMPORARY AMERICAN CULTURE

Abstract
In this article, I examine fire dancing - both as a performance art and as a subculture - by tracing its historical origins in traditional Samoan warrior dance. Fire dance has become increasingly popular in the United States in recent years.  In this article, I address the following questions:  Why do contemporary dancers in the U.S. perform South Pacific fire dance ?  And what is the dance's function and meaning today as compared to its function in Samoan culture?  I analyze the evoltion and migration of fire dance from the Pacific Islands to the U. S., finding that, in every time and site in which it has been performed, fire dancing has consistently been utilized as a means of seeking and celebrating freedom and liberation.

CEREN MERT 

RESISTIVE SOUNDS OF EUROPE'S "ADOPTED" CHILDREN: THE   EAST/WEST AND BLACK/WHITE CROSSOVERS

Abstract
Globalization has not only homogenized and obliterated boundaries (imagined or otherwise), but it has also created and re-invented new territories where it proliferated new localities and identities.  This paper tires to cast light on the 'local' in terms of how it can act as a site of struggle and resistance against the dominant modes of representation.  The medium of music, to take one example, has become a significant means of communication, especially for those aggrieved diasporic identities, in their attempt to express and present their experiences as well as their political positions against the exclusionist practices in their host countries.  More specifically, the present essay focuses on hip-hop, and how the second and third generations of Turkish youths in Germany, and the second and third generations of South Asian youths in Britain, confront racist and discriminatory practices in their host countries through the subversice lyrics they employ; and how they incorporate their local problems, as well as their local sounds, while at the same time appropriating a global music form such as hip-hop.

EBONNI CHABALA

HOW FREE IS FREE?  FREEDOM OF SPEECH IN THE CONTEXT OF THE 'WAR ON TERROR'

Abstract
The aim of this essay to interrogate the public rhetoric that presents and justifies the so-called war on terror as a war waged to protect Western values of freedom of speech and democracy.  My central claim is that instead of protecting the ideal of liberty, the so-called war on terror in fact vastly diminishes individual freedom, and freedom of speech, in particular.

MATTHEW ARKEL

SHOPPING TO SAVE LIVES: PRODUCT RED AND THE ILLUSION OF CONSUMER AGENCY

Abstract
Product Red is a for-profit humanitatian marketing campaign, designed to build, from the sales of specially designed "Red" products issued by a number of well-known corporate brands, a global fund to fight the spread of AIDS in Africa.  The list of companies participating in Product Red include American Express, Converse, Motorola, Gap, Apple, and Armani.  By analyzing the typographies employed in Product Red advertisements, I see to explain the ways in which the campaign attempts to mobilize various meta-narratives such as reality, urgency, and consumer agency, among other problematic Western ideologies, in order to profit from first-world consumers' guilt over the plight of the impoverished third world.  I argue that a humanitarian entity which claims to seek to improve Africans' quality of life by advertising the products of corporations that, in actuality, perpetuate economic contradictions and environmental imbalances between the first world and third world, is hypcritical.

NOTES ON CONTRIBUTORS