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Columbia College Chicago
Volume I Issue 3
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Volume I Issue 3


EDITORIAL STATEMENT
The Editorial Collective of Cultural Landscapes: A Cultural Studies Journal is proud to present its readers with a third volume of some interesting work in Cultural Studies.  The present volume, like the first and second, displays the journal's special and unwavering commitment to publishing the work of emerging scholars and student researchers in the field of contemporary cultural studies.

JOHN R. THOMPSON

HOMO/GENOUS TERRITORIES: QUEER YOUTH AND THE STRUGGLE FOR PUBLIC SPACE IN CHICAGO'S BOYSTOWN

 

Abstract
Public space has long been a central site of queer struggles for visibility and liberation.  The proliferation of gay enclaves in major cities across the United States is a prime example of the way in which queer communities have conceptualized, inhabited, and transformed public space.  Such is the case with Chicago's Boystown.  Since its formation in the 1970s, the neighborhood has been celebrated as a cultural hub for one of the country's largest metropolitan gay communities.  Yet, as neoliberalism causes public space to become increasingly privatized, and dominant gay culture and politics becomes characterized by what Lisa Dugan calls "the new homonormativity," Boystown has developed into a consumer-orientated business district.  This has given rise to a powerful gay elite that has claimed ownership to the neighborhood while embarking on a campaign against the queer youth of color who frequently assemble in Boystown's streets.  This essay examines the ways in which the rhetoric of "safety" has been racialized, used to justify the privatization of public space in Boystown, and used to target and monitor those deemed as Other.

EZEQUIEL GERSZONOWITZ 

TOURISM IN TIMES OF GLOBALIZATION

Abstract
Being one of the fastest growing service industries in current times, tourism is faced with faced with the constant task of marketing experiences that lack the tangibility observed in the capitalist exchange of classic commodities.  In its modern form, the industry appears to have been deeply shaped by current globalization processes.  Because they provide both a means to an increased mobility along communication technologies and the foundation for the differentiated locality, these global activities contribute to a growth in the desire for traveling.   The analysis of tourism industries necessitates a closer look at the cultural economies, based on symbolic, highly marketed experiences rather than on products themselves.  This article sets out to investigate the impact of medicated forms of promotion and consumption of tourism.  By taking the study of cultural commodities as the formation fo teh modern tourism, it examines how globalization process have had an essential role in the shaping of contemporary tourism and, in turn, of that of landscapes and identity.

PHILIP M. BRATTA

FLAG DISPLAY POST 9/11: A DISCOURSE ON AMERICAN NATIONALISM

Abstract
After September 11th, 2001, Americans display fifty stars and thirteen stripes on front lawns, automobilies, pins, shirts, hats, pictures and memorabilia as part of a patriotic narrative about the 9/11 tragedy.  The flag functioned as a communicative cultural artifact deployed in a crucial and contested moments to symbollize a unifying national force.  The "Red, White and Blue," as it has historically, filled gaps where inconsistencies arise in national discourse and dissemmated and reinforced mythologies and narratives of a "coherant" imagined American nation.  This project offers explanations for the fixation on the flag and how it conflates the ideologies of patriotism and nationalism by deconstructing three post 9/11 cultural images: (1) an NBC Special Report following the fall of the Twin Towers, (2) Thomas E. Franklin's Ground Zero Spirit, and (3) President George W. Bush's September 20th, 2001 speech to Congress.

PAUL B. NIELL

THE EMERGENCE OF THE CEIBA TREE AS A SYMBOL IN THE CUBAN CULTURAL LANDSCAPE

Abstract
The ceiba tree on Havana's Plaza de Armas has undergone various physical changes through time, from replanting to reconfiguration with addition of civic monuments.  Indeed, the tree's social functions and meanings for the city's population have undergone various periods of creation and revision.  By the eighteenth century, the ceiba of Havana was known as the site where the Spanish conquistadors held the first Christian mass and town council meeting of the city in the sixteenth century, an invented tradition tied to a late colonial academicism and a search for origins and identity.  Yet few studies have attempted to get beneath the myth to undercover a broader set of possibilities as to how this tree in Havana became an important multivalent symbol in the Cuban cultural landscape.  How was its Early Modern and Modern significance, for example, informed by indigenous Americans, colonialism, slavery, revolutionary events, and African American culture, from pre-Contact times to the present?  Every November 16th,m the city honors the tree with rituals that reveal the influence of both civic traditions and Afro-Cuban religious practices.  The diverse historical actors and audiences associated with the ceiba of Havana played an under-investigated role in its contemporary significance.

FARID FARID

SUI(ING) GENERIS PAIN

Abstract
This paper argues that pain in its common cultural understanding needs to be expanded to include racialised and corporealised dimensions.  Through the harrowing case of an Australia Defence Force disaster of shooting at an Iraqi family at a Baghdad checkpoint injuring them physically and psychically, this paper sheds light on the messy cultural politics of racialised suffering and its misrecognition by the Australian government as part of the imperial logic of neo-colonial occupation.  This essay presents testimonies of three diasporic Iraqi women in Sydney (Australia) through my ethnographic fieldwork, to interrogate the transnational intertwinement of affective economies of embodiment that recognise the centrality of pain in the formation of Iraqi diasporic identities.


NOTES ON CONTRIBUTORS