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Columbia College Chicago
2007 Programs

2007 Programs

 

EXECUTION OF JUSTICE, production by About Face Theatre 
January 10-February 18, 2007
Victory Gardens Theatre


The Institute and About Face Theatre continue their two-year old collaboration as educational partners. As part of this collaboration, the Institute hosts groups of Columbia College students and other individuals for special performances, and participates in post-discussions. 

Execution of Justice, written by award winning playwright Emily Mann and directed by Gary Griffin, investigates the assassination in 1978 of San Francisco Supervisor, Harvey Milk (the first openly gay politician ever elected to high office) and Mayor George Moscone (who supported gay rights) by former City Supervisor Dan White.  The verdict was sensational. Dan White was convicted of manslaughter rather than first-degree murder and sentenced to just seven years in prison. 
 
The Institute hosted a group of over 40 Columbia College students, faculty, and staff to view the production and participate in an after-performance discussion with the actors, creative director, and production staff.

DISCUSSION W/CONSTITUTIONAL COURT JUSTICE ALBIE SACHS
January 26, 2007
Columbia College Chicago, Ferguson Hall 600 S. Michigan


The Institute was pleased to present a special discussion with South Africa Constitutional Court Justice Albie Sachs, introduced by Congresswoman Jan Schakowsky, about democracy, human rights, gender, architecture, and arts and culture. Justice Sachs conducted a virtual tour of the award-winning Constitutional Court of South Africa, which was built in the heart of the Old Fort Prison where both Gandhi and Mandela had been imprisoned.  United States Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg has described the building as “the most beautiful court building” that she has seen in the world.  A new book about the court, Light on a Hill: Building the Constitutional Court of South Africa, was available for sale.
 
More than 150 people attended this program with standing-room only in Ferguson Hall.  It was followed by a special private dinner honoring Albie Sachs, attended by 60 individuals, including Institute partners, potential donors, and Columbia College faculty and staff. 

2ND ANNUAL WOMEN IN HIP-HOP
February 8, 2007 HotHouse, 31 E. Balbo

This program is part of the Institute’s multi-year Gender and Hip-Hop Initiative engaging in critical analysis and public discourse about issues of masculinity, feminism and gender as they are being defined, shaped and applied through this powerful genre.

As part of the Gender and Hip Hop initiative, the 2nd Annual Women and Hip-Hop program brought together socially-conscious performers Psalm One and the Wonda Women Project’s Ang13 and Unmuvabo Vendetta. They were joined by JaMiss and Latonea Miller, emerging artists selected from the Columbia College student and alumni, and mentees in the Gender and Hip Hop Initiative.  Following the performance was a discussion on issues of gender and representation in Hip-Hop music and videos, as well as a special CD release party for the Wonda Women Project. 

Columbia College students, faculty, and staff were invited to attend the event free-of-charge as part of the 150 person audience.
 
“DOIN’ IT:  SEX, DISABILITY AND VIDEOTAPE” and “WHY THEY GOTTA DO ME LIKE THAT": THE EMPOWERED FE FES TAKE ON BULLYING” FILM SCREENING & DISCUSSION
February 13, 2007
Conaway Center, 1104 S. Wabash


The Institute partnered with Beyondmedia Education and Access Living’s Empowered Fe Fes for a screening of two documentary films: Doin’ It: Sex, Disability and Videotape and Why They Gotta Do Me Like That: The Empowered Fe Fes Take on Bullying, followed by a panel discussion and reception with individuals from the films. More than 60 people filled the Conaway Center for this event.

Beyondmedia Education’s mission is to collaborate with underserved and underrepresented women, youth, and communities to tell their stories and organize for social justice through the creation and distribution of media arts. They specialize in media literacy and production workshops that equip marginalized communities to use these powerful tools to explore their lives, develop their voices, and educate the public about their issues.

Access Living is a cross disability organization governed and staffed by a majority of people with disabilities. Access Living fosters the dignity, pride, and self-esteem of people with disabilities, and enhances the options available to them so that they may choose and maintain individualized and satisfying lifestyles. Access Living recognizes the innate rights, abilities, needs, and diversity of people with disabilities, works toward their integration into community life, and serves as an agent of social change.

PULP, PRODUCTION BY ABOUT FACE THEATRE 
March 7-April 15, 2007
Victory Gardens Theatre
 

The Institute and About Face Theatre continue their two-year old collaboration as educational partners. As part of this collaboration, the Institute hosts groups of Columbia College students and other individuals for special performances, and participates in post-discussions.  
 
Pulp is an homage to the sultry, jazzy world of 1950’s lesbian pulp fiction.  Following some scandalous encounters on a Texas military base, the lead character Terry heads for Chicago and The Well, a club for women who love women, where forbidden desire lurks behind every innuendo. Featuring a jazzy score and sensational cabaret acts, this playfully steamy comedy was originally produced by About Face in 2004, and was remounted with the original cast in response to overwhelming demand from the audience base.    

RESISTANCE AND SOCIAL MOVEMENTS: THE ON-GOING FIGHT FOR FREEDOM
April 7, 2007
The DuSable Museum of African American History, 740 E. 56th Place


The Institute was proud to co-sponsor with the Public Square at the Illinois Humanities Council and other partners a special exhibition tour and presentation by Dr. Manning Marable at the DuSable Museum of African American History. The program began with a tour of the nationally-acclaimed exhibition, "381 Days: The Montgomery Bus Boycott Story," chronicling the hardship and courage of thousands of African Americans who successfully challenged a segregated bus system to open doors to equality.  After touring the exhibition, Dr. Marable explored the history of the civil rights era and its lessons for current movements struggling for equality. Dr. Marable is a Professor of Public Affairs, Political Science, and History at Columbia University in New York City. Following the presentation, attendees participated in small, facilitated discussions to share reflections on the exhibition and presentation, and explore the history and future of social justice organizing.

GENDER FUSIONS 3:  GENDER GO-ROUND ON THE PLAYGROUND
April 17, 2007 Location: HotHouse, 31 E. Balbo
Columbia College’s Office of GLBT Students & Q-Force


The Institute annually co-presents Gender Fusions 3 with the Columbia College Office of GLBT Students and Q-FORCE. Gender Fusions 3, the third annual night of queer performance and community dialogue featured renowned transgender activist Leslie Feinberg; a panel discussion with scholars, writers and activists about the notion of play; a performance by Leslie and the Lys; and a spectacle of drag, burlesque, spoken word, theatre, dance and song from a host of performers at Columbia College and throughout the city. A sold-out evening of entertainment and discussion, the event drew over 200 people from various communities of artists, students, educators, and activists.

The panel discussion was moderated by Jane M. Saks and featured E. Patrick Johnson (Chair of Performance Studies at Northwestern University and author of Sweet Tea: An Oral History of Black Gay Men of the South), Sam Park (Faculty in the English Department at Columbia College), Red Tremmel (Ph.D. candidate in History at the University of Chicago and documentary director and producer), and Lewis Wallace (Columbia College student as well as grassroots community organizer and sex educator).

The mission of Gender Fusions is to produce an annual performance event that creates a queer cultural space and forges a strong, active, vibrant queer community at Columbia College Chicago.  Through this program, the partners work toward creating queer and tranny visibility on campus; initiating thoughtful and critical dialogue; building bridges between queer students, staff and faculty at Columbia; and drawing upon the larger Chicago queer community to infuse, energize, and catalyze Columbia’s creative and critical community of learners, teachers and workers. 

GENETICS AND IDENTITY:  WHO ARE YOU?
April 18, 2007 
Spertus Museum
, 618 S. Michigan

The Institute partnered with the Illinois Humanities Council to present two programs as part of a year-long, statewide series, Future Perfect: Conversations on the Meaning of the Genetics Revolution. The entire series consisted of 25 programs statewide in a variety of formats: film, lectures, debates, art presentations, etc. The events took place throughout Illinois and were attended by almost 2,500 residents. The series received extensive news coverage from sources such as Chicago Public Radio, Illinois Channel, the Chicago Tribune, the Chicago Sun-Times, Conscious Choice, Time Out Chicago and many more.

This installment focused on the subject of gender and identity. Identity is shaped by a myriad of factors. To what extent do our perceptions of our genes affect our perceptions of ourselves and others? Can new information from genetic testing challenge long-held notions related to race, gender, sexual orientation, personality, or ethnic identity? How might genetic testing be used to include or exclude people from certain groups?   
 
The discussion was moderated by Laura Washington (Ida B. Wells-Barnett Professor, DePaul University and contributing columnist, Chicago Sun-Times) and featured Timothy F. Murphy, Ph.D. (Professor of Philosophy in the Biomedical Sciences, University of Illinois at Chicago and author of Gay Science: The Ethics of Sexual Orientation Research) and Sloan Williams, Ph.D. (Associate Professor, Director of Undergraduate Studies, Anthropology Department, University of Illinois at Chicago).  

OUT at CHM: GAYS IN THE REVOLUTION: LESBIAN AND GAY LIBERATION IN CHICAGO
April 19, 2007 
Chicago History Museum, 1601 N. Clark Street
 

The Institute is a proud co-sponsor of OUT at CHM, an annual series discovering the long and storied history of gay, lesbian, bisexual, and transgender people in Chicago. The Institute is a partner organization along with Center on Halsted, University of Illinois at Chicago Gender and Women’s Studies Department, and Weinberg College of Art and Sciences at Northwestern University. The presenting sponsor is the Elizabeth Morris Charitable Trust with additional support from UBS, The Irving Harris Foundation, and hosted by the Chicago History Museum.
In this installment, attendees learned about Chicago's lesbian and gay liberation movement from the people who led it.  Chicago’s rich history of gay activism from the late 1960s to the mid-70s remains largely unwritten and mostly forgotten. But two years before the Stonewall Riots in New York City, activists here were using the phrase “gay power.” Local gay men and lesbians participated in militant protests and students from many Chicago campuses fought for the right of same-sex couples to dance and socialize in public. Local lesbians published Lavender Women, one of the most influential lesbian-feminist newspapers in the United States. Chicago was one of only three cities to inaugurate “Pride” marches on the first anniversary of Stonewall, a tradition that continues today. 

Panelists in this program included Vernita Gray (activist for gay and lesbian rights in Chicago since 1969 and the GLBT Liaison for the Cook County State Attorney’s Office), Murray Edelman (founder of the Chicago Gay Liberation Movement that began in 1969), Margaret Wilson (retired schoolteacher and gay and women’s rights activist since 1967), and John D'Emilio (Professor in the History and Gender & Women’s Studies Programs at the University of Illinois at Chicago).

SHE SPEAKS VOLUMES: PANEL DISCUSSION & POETRY SLAM
April 26, 2007
Conaway Center & Hothouse, 31 E. Balbo


She Speaks Volumes is the cornerstone of the continuing "Arts, Advocacy, and Activism" collaboration between the Institute and the YWCA Metropolitan Chicago, addressing issues of violence against girls and women during Sexual Assault Awareness Month. 

In 2007, She Speaks Volumes was comprised of two-parts: a lunch-time panel discussion at Columbia College and a poetry slam at the Hothouse.  The panel discussion was entitled, "Where Do We Draw the Line? Creative Expression vs. the Perpetuation of a Rape Culture." Creative expression represents one's ideas, opinions and personal views as illustrated through various art forms: music, poetry, writing, film, etc.  For artists, having the right to express his/her self through their artistry is what drives their passion. However, some forms of creative expression stimulate covert and overt messages of sexual violence, which in turn can have an effect on the perpetuation of a rape culture. 

Moderated by Misty DeBerry, Columbia College Chicago graduate student and Institute fellow, the panel featured members of spoken word trio Diva Diction (Bassey, Amalia Ortiz, Ishle Park) and local female hip-hop emcees Ang13 and Unmuvabo Vendetta.

The poetry slam featured performances by the powerful and profound Diva Diction, a female multi-racial spoken word ensemble. The program drew a diverse audience from across the city to honor survivors of sexual assault and show how art and activism can be fused together to impact social change.

The sold-out program of over 200 attendees included Community, Artist and Activist Awards for individuals whose work demonstrates a commitment to anti-violence and social justice; Mary Jo Barrett (Executive Director and Co-Founder, Center for Contextual Change); C.C. Carter (artist and Founder, Pow-Wow Inc.); and Kathy Kempke (Coordinator of Prevention Education, YWCA South Suburban Center). 
 
GENDER & HIP-HOP COMMUNITY DIALOGUE
April 27-28, 2007 1-3pm
Doc Films at the University of Chicago and International House, Assembly Hall, University of Chicago


This program is part of the Institute’s multi-year Gender and Hip-Hop Initiative engaging in critical analysis and public discourse about issues of masculinity, feminism and gender as they are being defined, shaped and applied through this powerful genre.

The Institute and the Center for the Study of Race, Politics and Culture at the University of Chicago co-presented a two-day program addressing issues of gender, gender identity and representation in hip-hop music and videos. The first day included a screening of the documentary film Hip-Hop: Beyond Beats and Rhymes, directed by Byron Hurt, followed by a panel discussion. In his film, award-winning producer and director Byron Hurt exposes and explores the structures of violence, hyper-aggression and misogyny in much of today's hip-hop, interviewing a number of prominent artists and producers along the way, including Chuck D, Mos Def, Jadakiss, and Russell
Simmons.

Following the screening was a panel discussion moderated by Cathy Cohen (Professor of Political Science, University of Chicago), with Natalie Hopkinson and Natalie Y. Moore (co-authors of
Deconstructing Tyrone: A New Look at Black Masculinity in the Hip-Hop Generation) and Stephanie Shonekan (Professor of Humanities and Cultural Studies; Director, Black World Studies Program, Columbia College Chicago).

The second day featured a panel and community roundtable addressing the question "Does Hip-Hop Hate Women?" Moderated by Bakari Kitwana (co-founder of the first ever National Hip-Hop Political Convention and author of Why White Kids Love Hip-Hop), the panel featured TJ Crawford (co-founder and Chairman of the National Hip-Hop Political Convention); David Ikard (Assistant Professor in English at the University of Tennessee and creator of the first hip-hop course taught at the University); Joan Morgan (award-winning journalist and author of When Chickenheads Come to Roost: My Life as a Hip-Hop Feminist); Mark Anthony Neal (Associate Professor of Black Popular Culture at Duke University and author of New Black Man: Rethinking Black Masculinity), Amina Norman-Hawkins (writer, activist, hip-hop emcee, and Executive Director of the Chicago Hip-Hop Initiative), and Tracy Sharpley-Whiting (Director of the Black World Studies Program at Vanderbilt University and author of Pimps Up, Ho's Down: Young Black Women, Hip-Hop and the New Gender Politics).
 
More than 1,000 people attended and participated in this program. It also attracted wide media attention, including a taping and broadcast on C-SPAN and coverage by the Associated Press, Chicago Tribune and local news channels, including ABC Channel 7.

GENETICS & RACE:  HOW DOES RACE MATTER?
May 23, 2007  6:30pm
Spertus Museum, 618 S. Michigan
 

The Institute partnered with the Illinois Humanities Council to present two programs as part of a year-long, statewide series, Future Perfect: Conversations on the Meaning of the Genetics Revolution. The entire series consisted of 25 programs statewide in a variety of formats: film, lectures, debates, art presentations, etc. The events took place throughout Illinois and were attended by almost 2,500 residents. The series received extensive news coverage from sources such as Chicago Public Radio, Illinois Channel, the Chicago Tribune, the Chicago Sun-Times, Conscious Choice, Time Out Chicago and many more.

This installment focused on new research that aims to identify shared genetic markers that challenge some traditional concepts of race and ethnicity, and may reinforce others.  Do the results of this research reduce people to a set of genetic traits, perpetuate old forms of discrimination, and put certain populations at risk for further oppression?  How do we ensure that racial and ethnic groups maintain self-definition and self-control as genetic science advances?

The discussion was moderated by Harry Porterfield, feature news reporter for ABC 7 News and featured panelists Troy Duster, Ph.D., Professor of Sociology at New York University, Director of the Institute for the History of the Production of Knowledge, and author of Backdoor to Eugenics; Michele Goodwin, JD, LLM, Wicklander Chair and Director at the Health Law Institute, Director for Center for the Study of Race and Bioethics at DePaul University; and Blasé N. Polite, M.D., Instructor, Department of Medicine, Section of Hematology/Oncology at the University of Chicago. 
 
OUT at CHM:  AIDS, ART & ACTIVISM
June 5, 2007  6:30pm
Chicago History Museum, 1601 N. Clark Str
eet

The Institute is a proud co-sponsor of OUT at CHM, an annual series discovering the long and storied history of gay, lesbian, bisexual, and transgender people in Chicago. The Institute is a partner organization along with Center on Halsted, University of Illinois at Chicago Gender and Women’s Studies Department, and Weinberg College of Art and Sciences at Northwestern University. The presenting sponsor is the Elizabeth Morris Charitable Trust with additional support from UBS, The Irving Harris Foundation, and hosted by the Chicago History Museum.
In this installment, attendees explored the early response of filmmakers, and visual and performing artists to the AIDS crisis through film clips, spoken-word performances, and a panel discussion. Program panelists traced the legacy and direct influence of early gay activism and the women’s health movement on the emergence of AIDS activism. 

Panelists included Jennifer Brier, Gender and Women’s Studies and History, University of Illinois at Chicago; Mary Patten, Interdisciplinary Visual Artist and Activist involved in the formation of ACT-UP Chicago in the 1980s; Avery R. Young, Spoken Word Artist and Community Advocate.

LAS MUJERAS DE LA CAUCUS CHICANA FILM RELEASE AND DISCUSSION
September 1, 2007
The Center on Halsted, 3656 N. Halsted


The Institute co-sponsored a public release party for the documentary film Las Mujeres de la Caucus Chicana written, directed and produced by Linda Garcia Merchant. The film documents the stories and experiences of pioneering Latina women, and is the first production of Voces Primeras, a company founded by Ms. Garcia and dedicated to bringing these stories to the public.  

Emerging from the Feminist and Chicano movements of the 1960s and 1970s is the story of six Latinas who through a series of “Aha!” moments answered the call to action.  Their ideological differences, personal experiences and upbringings brought them to a monumental turning point in their lives: the National Women’s Political Caucus (NWPC) and the 1977 International Women’s Year National Women’s Convention.  As chosen delegates from the states of Illinois, California and Texas, these women formed the NWPC Chicana Caucus, which represented Latina sisters across the nation and worked towards liberation. 
 
CRITICAL ENCOUNTERS:  POVERTY & PRIVILEGE TOWNHALL FORUM
September 26, 2007
Conaway Center, 1104 S. Wabash, 1st Floor
Office of the Provost, Center for Teaching Excellence


Each year, Columbia College Chicago identifies a theme as the subject for its Critical Encounters Initiative, a year-long college-wide examination that serves as a model for interactive, community-inclusive civic engagement exploring the relationship between art and social science, artistic action and revolution.  During 2007-2008, Columbia College has chosen the theme of Poverty & Privilege. As part of its key involvement, the Institute co¬hosted a Town Hall Forum to begin a layered and complicated discussion engaging our ideas, perceptions and knowledge about poverty and privilege.  The panelists included activists and civic and community leaders, whose professional and personal work is directly related to these broad issues from a variety of perspectives, including: justice, equity, access, health, education, employment, faith, economic development, and participation. 

The panel was moderated by Shanita Akintonde (Professor, Marketing Communication, Columbia College Chicago) and featured; Jim Charlton (Research Assistant Professor, Disability Studies, University of Illinois at Chicago); Reverend Doris Green (Director of Community Affairs, AIDS Foundation of Chicago); Richard L. Jones, PhD (President and CEO, Metropolitan Family Services); Ngoan Le (Vice President of Programs, Chicago Community Trust); Douglas Mann (President, Global Business Assist); and Amy Rynell (Director, Mid-America Institute on Poverty, Heartland Alliance for Human Needs & Human Rights).

The mission of Critical Encounters and the goals of this program are to foster engaged discussions which serve as catalysts to generate new knowledge and understanding, begin to create shifts in attitudes and perceptions, and encourage civic activism.  

DARFUR: IMAGERY AND REALITY SYMPOSIUM
October 8, 2007
James Simpson Theater, Field Museum


The Institute was proud to co-present this symposium exploring the traditions of culture, family and gender alongside the current humanitarian crisis in the western Sudan region.  Introductory remarks were given by Leslie Thomas (curator) and Jane M. Saks. Participating discussants included: Oliver Bercault (Human Rights Watch), Daoud Hari (Voices from Darfur), Connie Kamara (American Refugee Committee International), Ryan Spencer Reed (photojournalist), and moderator Dr. Lynette A. Jackson (Associate Professor, African American Studies and Gender and Women’s Studies, University of Illinois at Chicago).  Introduced by Senator Dick Durbin, the program began with a performance by the Chicago Children’s Choir and attracted more than 500 people. 

This symposium took place during the October 7-14 presentation of DARFUR/DARFUR, an internationally touring exhibit of digitally-projected images highlighting the crisis and culture of Darfur, Sudan.  The project features photographs taken in Darfur by former U.S. Marine Brian Steidle and photojournalists Lynsey Addario, Mark Brecke, Helene Caux, Ron Haviv, Paolo Pellegrin, Ryan Spencer Reed, and Michael Safdie.  This stunning and powerful presentation provided visual education about the richly multi-cultural region while exposing the horrors of the ongoing humanitarian crisis.

WONDA WOMEN PROJECT:  ENOUGH IS ENOUGH FILM SCREENING AND DISCUSSION
October 11, 2007
Film Row Cinema, 1104 S. Wabash, 8th Floor


This program is part of the Institute’s multi-year Gender and Hip-Hop Initiative engaging in critical analysis and public discourse about issues of masculinity, feminism and gender as they are being defined, shaped and applied through this powerful genre.

The Wonda Women Project is a Chicago-based network of female hip-hop emcees working to empower women and promote a socially-conscious message through hip-hop. Led by local hip-hop emcees, activists, and Institute Fellows Ang13 and Unmuvabo Vendetta, the group produced a documentary film about their Summer 2007 Zero Tolerance Tour, capturing interviews and performances with female hip-hop artists and activists from across the country.  

Through the final film, Enough is Enough, the Wonda Women Project aims to reveal a compelling portrait of women’s experiences in the hip-hop industry, including their battles with misogyny, violence, and the degradation of women.  It also hopes to unite women through hip-hop, to promote positive female images among young women and girls, and to support emcees whose socially-conscious work struggles for mainstream attention. 

As a co-sponsor of the Wonda Women Project, the Institute proudly presented a premiere screening of the film-in¬progress, followed by a discussion with Ang13 (emcee and founder, Wonda Women Project), Unmuvabo Vendetta (emcee and project coordinator, Wonda Women Project) and Invincible (Detroit emcee and hip-hop activist), moderated by Natalie Y. Moore (journalist and co-author of Deconstructing Tyrone: A New Look at Black Masculinity in the Hip-Hop Generation).
 
Approximately 200 people attended this screening, which was followed by an audience discussion. 

“SCALE” OUTREACH STRATEGY SUMMIT (invited working group)
October 15, 2007
Institute offices, 218 S. Wabash, 7th Floor


The Institute organized an Outreach Strategic Summit meeting facilitated by Celia Alario centered around the documentary film SCALE: Ending the Bush Agenda in the Media Age, directed by Alexandra Juhasz.  This film investigates the efforts of one person’s role as an activist addressing issues of global importance based on author and activist Antonia Juhasz’s work and promotional tour for her best-selling book The Bush Agenda: Invading the World One Economy at a Time.

The film tries to ask the question, how can media serve as an organizing tool to fuel transformative conversations about effective activism and social movements?  In partnership with Alexandra Juhasz, the Institute invited a group of 15 organizers, advocates, artists, media professionals and scholars from various disciplines, organizations and experiences to share creative energies and strategize regarding effective activism and organizing across disciplines, approaches, and communities, and interests.

FESTIVAL OF DEMOCRACY: UNLEASHING RADICAL IMAGINATION
October 20, 2007
Experimental Station, 6100 South Blackstone Avenue


As the 2008 election season speeds ahead, The Public Square at the Illinois Humanities Council in collaboration with the Institute and many other partners, presented the Festival of Democracy: Unleashing Radical Imagination, a gathering designed to launch a conversation about the kind of world we want to build together.  
 
Even as the presidential debates enter new territory, with candidates taking part in YouTube and online-only debates, the partners wished to pose the questions: how can we move beyond political platforms and media sound bites to engage in meaningful dialogue? How can we create a more participatory democracy as we raise and wrestle with local and global issues?  How do various issues intersect in ways that provide new insights and directions? How can we make connections between ongoing struggles that help us envision a more democratic and just world?

This gathering joined activists, scholars, artists, and all those interested, to collectively imagine and grapple with issues of human rights, political power, and struggles for social justice.  Participants included:  Bernardine Dohrn (Northwestern University), Laura Flanders (Air America), Bill Fletcher (Center for Labor Renewal), Rashid Khalidi (Columbia University), Lisa Yun Lee (Jane Addams Hull-House Museum), Salim Muwakkil (In These Times), Leena Odeh (Ella’s Daughters), Barbara Ransby (University of Illinois at Chicago), Yunuen Rodriguez (Women & Girls CAN, Females United for Action); Stan Willis (attorney and co-chair, Chicago Conference on Black Lawyers), Quentin Young (Physicians for a National Health Program), and performances by Idris Goodwin, Ugochi, and Kevin Coval.

USING HIP-HOP TO EMPOWER YOUNG WOMEN: A WORKSHOP FOR ADULT ALLIES
October 26, 2007
Conaway Center, 1104 S. Wabash, 1st Floor
 

The Institute co-sponsored this adult workshop organized by the Young Women’s Action Team designed to assist youth workers, prevention educators, counselors and other adult allies in understanding how mass media and hip-hop culture affect the lives of young women and girls. Through interactive activities and group discussion, 45 participants explored messages about sexuality, relationships, and gender in hip-hop and popular culture, and discussed strategies used by women and girls of color to resist denigrating media images and explore using hip-hop as a tool for empowerment and social change.  The workshop was presented by Dr. Carla Stokes, a scholar-activist, health educator, and President and Founder of Helping Our Teen Girls in Real Life Situations, Inc. (HOTGIRLS), an Atlanta-based nonprofit organization dedicated to improving the health and lives of black young women and girls.

MACHOS
November 8 – December 16, 2007
Chicago Dramatists, 1105 W Chicago Avenue

 
The Institute was proud to co¬sponsor MACHOS, an interview-based play about contemporary masculinities presented by Teatro Luna. In 2006, frustrated with boyfriends, brothers and bosses, Latina women set out to answer the question: what are men really thinking? The result is MACHOS, a performance drawn from interviews with 50 men nationwide and performed by an all-Latina cast in drag.
From a young man’s relationship with his correctional officer father, to a man cheating on his wife with himself, to an epic confrontation between fraternity brothers, MACHOS presents a range of true-life stories with Teatro Luna's trademark humor and unique Latina point of view. MACHOS was developed and directed by Coya Paz and created by El Teatro Luna. Coya Paz and Institute/Goodman Fellow Tanya Saracho are the Co-Artistic Directors of Teatro Luna. 

LECTURE WITH VISITING ARTIST SUE COE 
November 29, 2007
Film Row Cinema, 1104 S. Wabash, 8th Floor
Anchor Graphics, Art + Design Department, Critical Encounters

Columbia College Chicago’s Anchor Graphics hosted a week-long artist residency with Sue Coe, one of the most important politically-oriented artists living in the U.S. today.  The Institute in collaboration with Anchor Graphics, the Art + Design Department, and the College-wide Critical Encounters initiative co-presented a lecture by Coe at Film Row Cinema.
From the outset of her career working as an illustrator for such publications as the New York Times and Time Magazine, Coe was committed to reaching a broad audience through the print media.  Working in the tradition of such socially-oriented German artists as George Grosz, Otto Dix and Kathë Kollwitz, Coe uses printmaking as a means of political consciousness-raising and social change. A self-proclaimed artist and activist, she has created a profoundly provocative and influential body of work addressing such issues as AIDS, animal rights, apartheid, labor and sweatshop conditions, gender-based violence, and war.