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Columbia College Chicago
2008 Programs

2008 Programs


LIONESS OF LISABI: FILM PREMIERE
December 13, 2008.
Film Row Cinema, 1104 S. Wabash, 8th Floor.

Lioness of Lisabi is a new short film written and produced by Institute Faculty Fellow, Dr. Stephanie Shonekan, inspired by the life of Funmilayo Ransome Kuti, the mother of Fela Kuti. The Institute Fellowship supported Dr. Shonekan’s development of the film’s screenplay. Lioness of Lisabi follows Funmi, a curious girl who begins to question the traditional positions of women in 1940s colonial Nigeria. While she admires the strength and ingenuity of her mother, Iyalode, a successful market woman, she is also drawn to the new knowledge she is gaining in her books. Funmi is both anxious and excited by her mother’s plans to send her to England to continue her education. But just before she embarks on her journey, Funmi begins to question her future. First, she is reminded that it is not a woman’s place to get an education. Second, the dubious tax collector threatens Iyalode with raised taxes. Third, and most frightening, the mysterious masquerade terrorizes all the women. Even Iyalode is intimidated by the masquerade. Funmi seriously begins to doubt the wisdom of going to England. With the help of a strange African-American angel, Funmi begins a journey to find herself.  When she returns from England, Funmi is faced with new and old challenges. The new challenge is her inability to fit in with the market women who see her now as an outsider. The old challenge is, once again, the frightening masquerade. Funmi realizes that neither her Western education nor her guardian angel will help her overcome these new obstacles.




against a transnarrative:SNEAK PREVIEW AND DISCUSSION
November 20, 2008.
Film Row Cinema, 1104 S. Wabash, 8th Floor.

against a trans narrative is a new documentary by filmmaker and Institute Fellow, Jules Rosskam. The Institute is proud to co-sponsor this sneak preview and discussion at Film Row Cinema. against a trans narrative functions as a dialogue between friends, cultures, and generations addressing issues of representation, identity-formation, and the various forces that act together to build (or dismantle) communities. Specifically, the film analyzes the construction of the dominant trans-masculine “narrative” and how this influences and potentially hinders people’s conceptions of themselves. What forms of regulation, self or otherwise, must we partake in to be part of a community, and at what cost? The goal of this video is to instigate conversations amongst feminists, queers, transfolks, and anyone else invested in radically shifting the ways in which we construct personal and historical narratives. against a trans narrative is striking in its endeavor to speak to the same communities it represents, but through its integrity, can resonate with anyone who has ever struggled to reconcile their identity with the communities they come from/belong to.




RUINED: POST-PERFORMANCE DISCUSSION
November 16, 2008
Goodman Theatre, 170 N. Dearborn Street

The Institute co-sponsored with Goodman Theatre a post-performance discussion of Ruined, produced at the Theatre and written by Institute-Goodman Fellow, Lynn Nottage.

Set in the Democratic Republic of Congo in the year 2000, Ruined follows a young woman's nightmarish path to Mama Nadi, a savvy businesswoman who in the midst of a complez war both protects and profits from the women whose bodies have become battlegrounds. At once heartbreaking and captivating, Ruined pays homage to the courage, resilient women who must piece themselves together after the ruin.

Ruined, directed by Kate Whoriskey, had its world premiere at the Goodman Theatre from November 8 - December 7, 2008. Following the production at the Goodman, Ruined will be presented at the Manhattan Theatre Club in New York. It received 3 1/2 stars from the Chicago Tribune and postive reviews in the Sun-Times and Newcity.

The Institute will co-create and present future public programming related to the play Ruined with Fellow Lynn Nottage.




LUNCHEON WITH UMIDA NIYAZOVA AND HUMAN RIGHTS WATCH
November 2008.
218 S. Wabash, 7th Floor.


The Institute was proud to host a special lunch with independent journalist and activist Umida Niyazova. Niyazova embodies the struggle of Uzbek human rights defenders who, in spite of government repression, continue to speak out against the Uzbek government’s abuses. In the three years since government forces killed hundreds of unarmed protesters in the eastern city of Andijan, Uzbekistan’s rulers have continued to engage in widespread harassment, interrogations, house arrests, and arbitrary detention of civil society actors. Human Rights Watch honors Umida Niyazova, who, at great personal sacrifice and risk, has advocated on behalf of her fellow citizens and compelled the international community to scrutinize the Uzbek government’s deplorable human rights record.




MARGARET GARNER: SLAVERY AND THE LAW
November 6, 2008
Auditorium Theatre, 50 E. Congress Parkway

The Institute co-sponsored with the Chicago Committee on Minorities in Large Law Firms, a post opera-conversation focusing on the legal aspects of the story and the trial. The conversation included Ronne Hartlfield (Chair of Education and Community Engagement Committee for Margaret Garner), Rebecca Ford Terry (Senior Vice-President and General Counsel for Draper and Kramer; Institute Advisory Board Member), and Tracie Luck (featured star soprano of Margaret Garner)



MEET THE CREATORS: MARGARET GARNER
November 2, 2008
Auditorium Theatre, 50 E. Congress Parkway

The powerful new American opera by composer Richard Danielpour, with a libretto by Nobel laureate Toni Morrison and starring Denyce Graves and Tracie Luck, received its Chicago premiere November 1-9, 2008 at the Auditorium Theatre of Roosevelt University. Based on the true story of a fugitive slave who chooses death for herself and children rather than a return to slavery, Margaret Garner is a heart-wrenching lesson in history and humanity—and a grim reminder of the desperate plight of many who lived in the antebellum South, that defining American epoch. The Institute is proud to present in partnership with the Chicago Humanities Festival, Auditorium Theatre, and Roosevelt University, this opportunity to hear the opera’s creators discuss the genesis and development of this much-heralded production, which has previously visited Detroit, Cincinnati, Philadelphia, and Charlotte. Panelists included Richard Danielpour, composer; Kenny Leon, director; Stefan Lano, conductor; and others. Moderated by David DiChiera, general director of Michigan Opera Theatre, which co-commissioned the work and is co-producing this Chicago presentation. 


CHICAGO FOUNDATION FOR WOMEN: THE ART OF SOCIAL JUSTICE: HOW CREATIVITY COMPLEMENTS ADVOCACY
October 31, 2008
McCormick Place

As Chicago Foundation for Women’s centerpiece event, the Annual Luncheon and Symposium draws more than 2,000 people each year. This year, the Foundation welcomes Denyce Graves, renowned mezzo-soprano and star of the opera Margaret Garner to its 23rd celebration of women and girls. This year’s morning symposium is The Art of Social Justice: How Creativity Complements Advocacy. Moderated by the Institute’s Executive Director, Jane M. Saks, the Symposium will feature short presentations by panelists Katrina Browne (producer/director of “Traces of the Trade”), Romi Crawford (Assistant Professor, School of the Art Institute of Chicago), Susan Nussbaum (Access Living), and Coya Paz (Teatro Luna). There will also be a short performance by Teatro Luna and a talk-back discussion.


HOMOTOPIA: FILM SCREENING
October 22, 2008.
Ferguson Hall, 600 S. Michigan Avenue

Set sometime in the future-present, Homotopia chronicles a group of radical queer dedicated to exposing the trouble with gay marriage, dismantling the State, and undoing the Empire, while looking totally fierce. Woven into the story of Yoshi's adventures in love, resistance, and sex, is a critique of the crushing violence of homonormativity and its deadly perpetuation of US patriotism, conservative kinship structures and affective accumulation. Homotopia holds cinematic assumptions hostage through its motley assemblage of never-passing crew. Race, gender, ability and desire are reworked through an anti-colonial take of queer struggle creating a visual rhythm of melancholic utopianism that knows there may be no future, but still hopes today is not their last.


DANCING GRAVES
October 18, 2008.
International House-Assembly Hall, University of Chicago

The Institute is proud to be a co-sponsor of Dancing Graves, a groundbreaking theatrical performance that weaves together two narratives about Chicago's West side through an Afro-Cuban lens. Mercedes, the main character, leaves Cuba for the U.S. after a huge storm hits the island. The rest of the story explores Afro-Cuban (Yoruba and Bantu derived) religious mythology about death. The performance includes sound bites from interviews with various Southside and Westside residents including community activists, Afro-Cuban immigrants, artists and youth discussing community violence and family deaths. The project features a diverse collaboration of emerging scholars, dancers, university students, Chicago youth, and visual artists alongside a generation of Afro-Cuban folkloric song, dance and percussion virtuosos in the United States. Such a rare artistic collaboration in Chicago will powerfully reach out to diverse audiences and foster cross-cultural relations in a racially divided city. Other co-sponsors include The Lucumi Arts Association, The International House at the University of Chicago, and the Student Government of University of Chicago and Uncommon Grant Fund.



MUSIC THEATRE WORKSHOP at ILLINOIS YOUTH CENTER
October 2008.
Illinois Youth Center, Warrenville, IL.



Music Theatre Workshop (MTW) is a youth development arts organization that prepares young people to make positive life choices through the process of writing, producing, and performing original musical theatre inspired by personal stories. One of their signature programs, Fabulous Females, serves young women incarcerated at Illinois Youth Center (IYC) in Warrenville.  As part of this program, the young women share their stories and collaborate on a script that will be performed in late fall. The Institute is proud to partner on a special workshop with MTW and the Fabulous Females in October as part of a continuing partnership. This workshop will be led by AquaMoon, the writing, performance and artistic team of camil.williams and veronica bohanan. AquaMoon upholds its motto, “Dismantling the Culture of Silence,” by helping to bridge the gap between the streets, hip-hop feminism, performance activism, and academia.  The team works with educational institutions and community-based organizations to effect social change that will result in greater equality, freedom, and fuller lives for women and youth



WHERE WOMEN STAND IN CHICAGO NEWSROOMS
October 15, 2008
Ferguson Hall, 600 S. Michigan


Over the past year the Institute and the Association for Women Journalists-Chicago (AWJ-Chicago) collaborated on a pilot project to learn more about the state of women and journalism today in the local Chicago region. AWJ_Chicago is a nonpartisan , non-profit organization offering members a network that supports women in journalism and promotes the respectful treatment of women by the news media. As the first step, AWJ-Chicago devloped and administered in partnership with Bradley University an online survey questionnaire targeted at male and female professionals working across the spectrum of media in Chicago. The survey measured job satisfaction, salaries, roles in the newsroom, and more. In collaboration with Bradley University professors, Dr. Gregory Pitts and Dr. Margaret Young, the survey results were compiled and analyzed to produce a published report called "Where Women Stand: A Survey of Newsroom Staff in the Chicago Region."

The Institute and AWJ-Chicago collaborated on a public launch of the survey and panel program to discuss the results. The Institute organized a press conference at Columbia College to announce the study and its results to the local media. In attendance to present the materials were: Karen Kring (President, AWJ-Chicago), Cheryl Corley (AWJ-Chicago, and reporter, National Public Radio), Jane M. Saks (Executive Director, Institute), Dr. Gergory Pitts (Bradley University), and Dr. Margaret Young (Bradley University).

In the evening, the partners presented a public panel discussion at Columbia College that brought together four top Chicago women journalists to discuss the results of the new study. The discussion was moderated by Cheryl Corley (National Public Radio) and featured: Sally Eisele (Chicago Public Radio), Hanke Gratteau (formerly, Chicago Tribune), Lynn Norment (Ebony magazine), and Linda Yu (ABC 7 News).


THE BEAT GENERATION SYMPOSIUM
October 10-11, 2008.
Film Row Cinema, 1104 S. Wabash, 8th Floor

The Institute is proud to co-sponsor The Beat Generation Symposium, a two-day conference that will include academic panel discussions, a lecture/performance entitled “Hydrogen Jukebox: Allen Ginsberg and Deaf Poetry,” and evening readings of poetry by Joanne Kyger (October 10, 7:00pm) and Michael McClure (October 11, 7:00pm).  Registration and fees are required for the day-time panels. Poetry readings are free and open to the public. This Symposium is coordinated by Tony Trigilio of Columbia College’s English Department, in conjunction with the Office of the Provost; the Beat Studies Association; and Illinois State University. The Symposium is part of a two-month College-wide initiative, “and the Beats go on . . .,” centering on an exhibition of Jack Kerouac’s iconic manuscript scroll of On the Road (Center for Book and Paper Arts, October 3–November 26). By presenting dozens of exhibitions and programs, the College celebrates and investigates the disparate group of poets, artists, filmmakers and musicians known as the Beat Generation.

For more information: www.colum.edu/beats.

 

 

WHERE WOMEN STAND IN THE NEWSROOM
October 15, 2008, 6:00pm
Ferguson Hall, 600 S. Michigan Avenue, 1st Floor.
FREE


The Association for Women Journalists-Chicago (AWJ-Chicago) and the Institute join in bringing four top Chicago women journalists together to discuss the results of a new study, “Where Women Stand: A Survey of Newsroom Staff in the Chicago Region.” The study, released by AWJ-Chicago and completed in partnership with Bradley University, was administered via online questionnaire and takes a hard look at Chicago-area women journalists’ salaries, place in the newsroom, job satisfaction, and more. The discussion will be moderated by Cheryl Corley (National Public Radio) and will feature: Sally Eisele (Chicago Public Radio), Hanke Gratteau (formerly, Chicago Tribune), Lynn Norment (Ebony magazine), and Linda Yu (ABC 7 News).  AWJ-Chicago is a nonpartisan, non-profit organization offering members a network that supports women in journalism and promotes the respectful treatment of women by the news media  (www.awj-chicago.org).



MUSIC THEATER WORKSHOP AT ILLINOIS YOUTH CENTER
October 2008. Illinois Youth Center, Warrenvile, IL.


Music Theatre Workshop (MTW) is a youth development arts organization that prepares young people to make positive life choices through the process of writing, producing, and performing original musical theatre inspired by personal stories. One of their signature programs, Fabulous Females, serves young women incarcerated at Illinois Youth Center (IYC) in Warrenville.  As part of this program, the young women share their stories and collaborate on a script that will be performed in late fall. The Institute is proud to partner on a special workshop with MTW and the Fabulous Females in October as part of a continuing partnership. This workshop will be led by AquaMoon, the writing, performance and artistic team of camil.williams and veronica bohanan. AquaMoon upholds its motto, “Dismantling the Culture of Silence,” by helping to bridge the gap between the streets, hip-hop feminism, performance activism, and academia.  The team works with educational institutions and community-based organizations to effect social change that will result in greater equality, freedom, and fuller lives for womyn and youth. To learn more about the Institute’s workshops, visit our website: www.colum.edu/institutewomengender.  

 

DANCING GRAVES
October 18, 7:30pm.
International House-Assembly Hall, University of Chicago,
1414 E. 59th Street

The Institute is proud to be a co-sponsor of Dancing Graves, a groundbreaking theatrical performance that weaves together two narratives about Chicago's West side through an Afro-Cuban lens. Mercedes, the main character, leaves Cuba for the U.S. after a huge storm hits the island. This hurricane symbolizes that Mercedes should leave the island for the best interests of her family. The rest of the story explores Afro-Cuban (Yoruba and Bantu derived) religious mythology about death: where the world of the living is entangled with the ancestral spirit world along with the three divine cemetery orishas (Afro-Cuban deities): Oya, Obba and Yewa. The performance also includes sound bites from interviews with various Southside and Westside residents including community activists, Afro-Cuban immigrants, artists and youth discussing community violence and family deaths. The project features a diverse collaboration of emerging scholars, dancers, university students, Chicago youth, visual artists alongside a generation of Afro-Cuban folkloric song, dance and percussion virtuosos in the United States. The featured Afro-Cuban guest performers are from New York City (from Oriki Omi Odara and Raices Habaneras), Washington DC and Miami. Such a rare artistic collaboration in Chicago will powerfully reach out to diverse Chicago audiences and foster cross-cultural relations in a racially divided city. Other co-sponsors include The Lucumi Arts Association, The International House at the University of Chicago, and the Student Government of University Chicago and Uncommon Grant Fund.

Tickets are required: www.dancinggraves.com.


CITIZEN MOVEMENT FILM SERIES
September 9, 16, 23.
Film Row Cinema, 1104 S. Wabash, 8th Floor


Citizen Movement is a three-part Tuesday film series presented in conjunction with David Dorfman Dance that uses performance and film to investigate relationships between creativity, activism, politics, and history. Human beings exist in states of peacefulness and violence, self-reflection and consciousness, freedom and captivity. Citizen Movement uses three documentary films as catalysts to mine the impulses of human convictions and the impact of our actions on social systems. Film screenings begin at 6:30pm and are followed by discussions with filmmakers and special guests.

September 9: Traces of the Trade, a feature documentary in which filmmaker Katrina Browne discovers that her New England ancestors were the largest slave trading family in US History. She and nine cousins retrace the Triangle Trade and gain a powerful new perspective on the black/white divide. (82 mins)
www.tracesofthetrade.org
Post discussion with co-producer Juanita Brown and author Tom DeWolf

September 16: John Brown's Holy War, Martyr, madman, murderer, hero: John Brown remains one of history's most controversial and misunderstood figures. In the 1850s, he and his ragtag guerrilla group embarked on a righteous crusade against slavery that was based on religious faith-yet carried out with shocking violence. His execution set off a chain of events that led to the Civil War. (90 mins)
www.pbs.org/wgbh/amex/brown
Post discussion with David Dorfman and George Bailey

September 23: Weather Underground, Thirty years ago, a group of young American radicals announced their intention to overthrow the U.S. government. In THE WEATHER UNDERGROUND, former Underground members, including Bernadine Dohm,  Bill Ayers, Mark Rudd, David Gilbert and Brian Flanagan, speak publicly about the idealistic passion that drove them to "bring the war home" and the trajectory that placed them on the FBI's most wanted list. (92 mins)
www.upstatefilms.org/weather/main.html
Post discussion with Director Bill Siegal and David Dorfman

This film series is in conjunction with David Dorfman Dance presenting two evening length works at The Dance Center. Disavowal (September 25 and 28) inspired by John Brown; and underground (September 26 and 27) exploring the principles of political activism. For more information or to purchase tickets to the performances visit: www.colum.edu/dancecenter



HURRICANE SEASON: THE HIDDEN MESSAGES IN WATER
September 17-18, 2008
Center on Halsted, 3656 N. Halsted Street

Hurricane Season is a two-woman show by the nationally acclaimed and award-winning performance duo, Climbing PoeTree, about natural disaster and a great shift in universal consciousness. Through a tapestry of spoken-word poetry, theater, video projection, dance, shadow art, and a sound collage of personal testimonies, Hurricane Season connects the issues that surfaced in the aftermath of Hurricane Katrina to the “unnatural disasters” disenfranchised communities are experiencing nationwide on a daily basis. The post-show "solutions-cipher" will address the issues surfaced in Hurricane Season on a local level to cross-pollinate creative strategies for self-determination, and to turn the passion generated in the show into action manifested in the community. The Institute is proud to co-sponsor Hurricane Season, presented by Center on Halsted.
Tickets are required: $15 (or $10 for Students with Valid ID, available at the door). Visit www.centeronhalsted.org.




THROWING AWAY THE KEY: A FORUM ON THE EFFECTS OF LONG TERM SENTENCING
August 6, 2008
Ferguson Theatre, 600 S. Michigan Avenue


PARTNERS:    Tamms Year Ten Campaign, John Howard Association, Citizens for Earned Release, Chicago Branch of the National Alliance Against Racist and Political Repression, Campaign to End the Death Penalty, Not in Vain, Statesville Speaks, Justice Coalition of Greater Chicago, and Liberal Education Department of Columbia College Chicago

This year marks the anniversary of two notorious landmarks of Illinois corrections—30 years since the abolition of parole and 10 years since the opening of Tamms supermax prison. Now, two House Bills have been introduced to restore some balance between punishment and rehabilitation. Throwing Away the Key is a public forum in which the proposed legislation will be discussed by ex-offenders, family members, educators, legislators, and reform advocates. Still Point Theatre Collective will present an excerpt from “Sisters Rising,” in which ten formerly incarcerated women tell their story. Speakers will discuss the shattering impact of long-term sentencing laws and the psychological and physical damage caused by prolonged solitary confinement.

 

TELEVISION PREMIER OF /TRANS/PARENT
BY INSTITUTE FELLOW JULES ROSSKAM
June 27, 2008

As part of WTTW-11's June Outreach Programming, the Institute announces the television premiere of the award-winning film by Institute Fellow and filmmaker Jules Rosskam. In a world that sees only pink or blue, /trans/parent tells the extraordinary stories of 19 transgendered men from 14 different states who gave birth. Jules Rosskam is an artist, activist and educator with over 8 years of professional experience in the film and video industry, as well as a decade of community-based media education. As the Summer 2007 Institute Fellow, Jules worked to develop a new film which is a cross-genre, cross-racial, cross-generational look at trans-masculine communities and how they are regulated both internally and externally. That project is currently in post-production and set to be released in Fall 2008.

BLACK IS BLACK AIN'T
FROM THE MOYNIHAN REPORT TO OBAMA'S CANDIDACY
June 8, 2008. 2pm. Swift Hall, Rm 310
University of Chicago, 1025 E. 58th Street, Chicago

Any discussion of race inevitably ends with a glass half-full or half-empty type of question.

The Institute is pleased to co-present this lecture event with the Renaissance Society at the University of Chicago featuring Camille Charles and Lawrence Bobo, two of the most lauded scholars in their fields.

Camille Charles, Associate Professor of Sociology, Faculty Associate Director, Center for Africana Studies, University of Pennsylvania

Lawrence Bobo, W.E.B. DuBois Professor of Sociology, Harvard University

OUT & PROUD IN CHICAGO
June 3 & June 9, 2008

The Institute is a proud sponsor and educational partner with WTTW-11 in presenting the documentary film Out & Proud in Chicago. The film premieres on WTTW-11 on Tuesday, June 3 at 7:30pm, with an encore presentation Monday, June 9 at 8:00pm. Narrated by actress and Chicago native Jane Lynch, this new 90-minute documentary provides a historical perspective for Chicago's lesbian, gay, bi-sexual, and transgender community- from the 19th century to the present day. Stories of struggle and success-about legal harassment, medical misunderstanding, religious intolerance, and human rights- are told in this groundbreaking production. "We're working with voices and history, looking to understand and share the stories of those whose courage and sense of personal strength helped shape and change an entire society's concept of what it means to be a fully respected, fully accepted member of the broader human family," says co-producer Alexandra Silets. For more information, visit http://www.wttw.com.

THE BALLAD OF EMMETT TILL: EDUCATIONAL PARTNERSHIP
April 26-June 1, 2008
Goodman Theatre, 170 N. Dearborn Street
Acclaimed playwright Ifa Bayeza is a recipient of the Institute-Goodman Theatre Fellowship, a unique partnership supporting playwrights of color. This Fellowship supported the development of Bayeza's new play, The Ballad of Emmett Till, which will premiere at the Goodman Theatre April 26 through June 1. The now legendary story of Emmett Till is believed by many to be the start of the modern civil rights movement of the 1950s and remains one of the most pivotal incidents in a monumental era. This world premiere- part history and part ghost story, and directed by Oz Scott- is a jazz integration of past and present, the living and the dead, factual accounts and creative interpolation. Bayeza captures the powerful truths at the heart of the story, creating a soaring work of music, brilliant poetry and theatricality. For this production, the Institute is partnering on educational programs in collaboration with the Goodman Theatre and other city-wide civic and cultural organizations by helping create a multi-disciplinary program investigating issues illuminated by the production, such as cultural legacies emanating from profound social events.

BLACK IS BLACK AIN'T
POST BLACK: THERE AND BACK AGAIN
June 1, 2008, 2pm.
University of Chicago, Kent Hall, Rm 120
1020 E. 58th Street, Chicago

Open to the Public & Free of Charge

Never mind transcending race, will we ever get beyond "post-black?" That is the question.

The Institute is pleased to co-present this panel discussion with the Renaissance Society at the University of Chicago. The panel, featuring artist Laureate Kerry Jame Marshall, will address this subject through a series of presentations and offer varying perspectives on the issue.

Panelists
Darby English,
Art Historian, University of Chicago
Kerry James Marshall, Artist
Kym Pinder, Art Historian, The School of the Art Institute of Chicago
Greg Foster Rice,
Art Historian, Columbia College Chicago

OUT AT CHM: SCREAMING QUEENS AND LAVENDER PANTHERS: A HISTORY OF TRANSGENDER ACTIVISM
May 8, 2008. Reception 5:30pm. Program 6:30pm.
Chicago History Museum, 1601 N. Clark Street
The Institute is a proud partner of the Chicago History Museum's OUT at CHM an annual series exploring the history of LGBT art, politics and culture in Chicago. This installment takes a look at the history of transgender activism in Chicago and across the country. Queer historian and filmmaker Susan Stryker will explore the events from the drag queen prostitutes who rioted against police in San Francisco's Tenderloin district to the collapse of the Lavendar Panthers.

IMMIGRATION AT THE MARGINS
April 30, 2008. 9am-5pm.
Center on Halsted, 3656 N. Halsted
In partnership with the Chicago LGBTQ Immigrants Alliance (CLIA) and the Center on Halsted's Global Gay Initiative, the Institute is a co-sponsor of this community forum on immigration. Presented in complement to the May 1 rallies, this program is part of an on-going effort to integrate critical analysis into real change by working closely with the immigration rights community to inform and effect changes that take into account issues of gender and sexuality.

The forum will begin with a plenary session with speakers on the following topics: Day Laborers; Sex Work & Sex Trafficking; Media Representation on Immigration Crises and Scandals; Domestic Violence & Immigration; HIV Ban and its Effects; and more. Following the plenary will be break-out sessions focusing on and providing deeper analysis of the HIV ban, trafficking, media analysis and immigration reform.

GENDER FUSIONS 4: BUSTING UP THE BINARIES
April 25-26, 2008. 1104 S. Wabash, 1st Floor & 8th Floor
The Institute is a proud co-sponsor of Gender Fusions 4, the fourth installment of this annual performance event aimed at creating a queer cultural space and forging a strong, active and vibrant queer community at Columbia College Chicago and throughout the city. On April 25: A film screening and dialogue about trans and gender variant identity and culture (Film Row Cinema, 8th Floor, 6pm). On April 26: "Forging New Queer Geographies: Busting Up the Binaries" discussion (Conaway Center, 1st Floor, 3:30-5:30pm) and the annual Performance Spectacle featuring drag, burlesque, spoken word, theatre, dance and song from a host of performers (Conaway Center, 1st Floor, 8pm). Film screening and discussions are free. Tickets are required for the Spectacle: $5 students and senior citizens, $10 general admission. To reserve tickets: 312.344.6126, or for more information: 312.344.8594, lgbtqoffice@gmail.com.

SHE SPEAKS VOLUMES, POETRY SLAM
April 24, 2008. 6-8pm. Alhambra Palace, 1240 W. Randolph
The Institute and YWCA Metropolitan Chicago continue their partnership for a second year with the She Speaks Volumes poetry slam event engaging the community to show how art and activism can impact social change. In recognition of Sexual Assault Awareness Month, the event gives voice to the silence surrounding sexual assault, using music and the arts to encourage young people to speak out against sexual violence and become activists for change in their local communities. This year's event features d'bi young anitafrika, one of Canada's most celebrated young artists, and is hosted by V103's Troi Tyler. As part of the event, the following individuals will also be honored: e.nina jay (Artist Award), Sharon Powell (Community Impact Award), and Debra Perry (YWCA Staff Award). As a partner and co-sponsor of She Speaks Volumes, the Institute is also facilitating a special workshop with d'bi young anitafrika in collaboration with Music Theater Workshop at the Illinois Youth Center. For tickets and more information: 312.762.2743 or www.ywcachicago.org.

THE HIP-HOP GENERATION: RACE, GENDER & THE VOTE
April 5, 2008, 1-4pm
University of Chicago, Ida Noyes Hall, Max Palevsky Theatre, 1212 E. 59th Street
The Institute is proud to co-sponsor with the University of Chicago’s Center for the Study of Race, Politics and Culture the next installment of the popular series of townhall meetings featuring leading hip-hop activists, scholars, artists, and representatives from the Chicago community. This timely forum on hip-hop and politics will engage students in a discussion of new forms of political participation, media representations of hip-hop and politics, and youth voter mobilization. Featured panelists include: Rosa Clemente, William Upski Wimsatt, Dr. Maya Rockeymoore, Bakari Kitwana, Dr. Vijay Prashad, M1 (aka Mutulu Olugbala), AquaMoon, and Crystal Holmes.

This program will be broadcast the following dates and times:
Sunday, May 11, 2008 12:30pm on Channel 21
Monday, May 12, 2008 9:30am on Channel 19
Saturday, May 24, 2008 9:00pm on Channel 21
Friday, May 30, 2008 9:30am on Channel 19

A CELEBRATION OF WOMEN IN CLASSICAL MUSIC
March 31, 2008. Pre-Discussion 7pm. Performance 7:30pm. Orchestra Hall at Symphony Center, 220 S. Michigan Avenue
The Institute is pleased to partner with Chicago Sinfonietta in paying tribute to the contributions women have made to classical music through the two-night performance, A Celebration of Women in Classical Music featuring guest conductor Tania Leon. Cuban-born Ms. Leon will conduct two of her own compositions, one of which features pianist Jade Simmons, plus other works by women from around the world, while trumpeter Alison Balsom guests on Haydyn's Concerto for Trumpet. For the March 31st performance, Institute Executive Director, Jane M. Saks will moderate a pre-discussion open to ticket-holders.

To purchase tickets or for more information please contact the Chicago Sinfonietta at 312.236.3681 ext. 2.

OUT at CHM: QUEER EXCLUSIONS: SEXUALITY AND U.S. CITIZENSHIP
March 27, 2008, Reception 5:30pm. Program 6:30pm.
Chicago History Museum, 1601 N. Clark Street
The Institute is a proud partner of the Chicago History Museum's OUT at CHM series, an annual series exploring the history of LGBT art, politics and culture in Chicago. This installment traces how questions of sexuality and race have shaped the way the U.S. distinguishes between "citizens" and "aliens." Siobhan Somerville will discuss how lesbians and gay men have navigated U.S. immigration and citizenship laws, and how these policies have actively queered migrants, regardless of their actual sexual orientation.

"SECRETS" EXHIBITION, OPENING RECEPTION
March 19, 2008. Reception 5-7pm.
Glass Curtain Gallery, 1104 S. Wabash Avenue, 1st Floor
Open to the Public & Free of Charge
The Institute is proud to co-sponsor the opening reception for Secrets, a self-organized exhibition intiated by the 6+ women's art collective in collaboration with eight Palestinian women artists, and presented at the Glass Curtain Gallery. This project has involved a series of social exchanges, workshops and publications, as well as an art exhibition traveling to several locations in the Occupied Territories of Palestine and the US. Over the course of two years and half a dozen trips to the West Band, solidarities have developed across great distances, connecting artists, cultural producers, institutions, educators, journalists, writers and social thinkers. The project owes its existence to the mobilization of their creative energies.

QUEER IN COLOR: PERFORMANCES AND DISCUSSIONS
March 13th & 17th. Hokin Annex, 623 S. Wabash, Avenue, 1st Floor
A collaboration of the Institute, Office of Multicultural Affairs and the LGBTQ Office of Culture and Community, Queer in Color aims to embrace, support, and enhance the visibility of LGBTQ students of color by providing cultural events where artistic work reflects the life stories, voices and social issues of queer communities of color. On March 13th 6-8pm, E. Patrick Johnson presents Pouring Tea: Black Gay Men of the South Tell Their Tales, a luminous one-man show steeped in oral history, followed by a discussion moderated by Sam Park (Faculty, English Department). On March 17, 5-7pm BrownOut: Resistance Rhymes in Color presents a radiant spoken word performance and rebel rousing featuring Kay Barrett and Sarwat Rumi, followed by a discussion with the artists.

URBAN BUSH WOMEN/COMPAGNIE JANT-BI: PRE-PERFORMANCE DISCUSSION
March 7, 2008
Reception 6pm. Discussion 7pm. Performance 8pm.
The Dance Center of Columbia College Chicago
1306 S. Michigan Avenue, Chicago

Open to the Public & Free of Charge
In collaboration with the Dance Center of Columbia College Chicago, the Institute will co-present a special pre-performance discussion for Les ecailles de la memoire (The Scales of Memory), a creative exchange between the all-female Urban Bush Women (U.S.) and the all-male Compagnie JANT-BI (Senegal). The discussion will feature Jawole Willa Jo Zollar (Artistic Director, Urban Bush Women) in conversation with Joan Gray (President of Muntu Dance Theatre of Chicago).

In 2004, these two world-renowned companies were in overlapping residencies at The Dance Center. During that time, the companies shared their work in studio, and their artistic directors agreed in the moment to collaborate on a new piece. Les ecailles de la memoire is the result of this collaboration and twelve weeks of creative development periods in Senegal and the United States. Acogny and Zollar explore themes of memory, resistance and love while highlighting the visceral link between African-Americans and Africans. It also inherently considers gender difference, as well as delves into predominately Christian tradition, dancers linked by common ancestry but separated by history and geography, and dancers who study both concert and vernacular dance forms.

GENDER, HUMAN RIGHTS AND MEDIA
March 6, 2008
Reception 5:30pm. Program 6:00pm.
Film Row Cinema, 1104 S. Wabash, 8th Floor
Open to the Public & Free of Charge
In recognition of International Women's Day, the Institute presents the 2nd annual panel program on gender and media, with this year's focus on human rights. Gender, Human Rights and Media brings together five leading writers, filmmakers, journalists, and scholars whose work ranges from broadcast reporting on Hurricane Katrina and South Africa's post-apartheid Truth and Reconciliation Commission, to a film on Argentina's state terrorism in the 1970s. Through individual presentations, media clips and discussion, the panelists will engage in personal and scholarly interpretations of the complicated role that media can play in reflecting, influencing and broadening our understanding of human rights.

Introduced by Jane M. Saks (Executive Director, Institute) and moderated by Laura S. Washington (Ida B. Wells-Barnett University Professor in Journalism, DePaul University), the panel discussion will feature Cheryl Corley (reporter, National Public Radio), Antjie Krog (poet, writer and journalist), Silvia Malagrino (visual artist and filmmaker), and Joe Richman (independent producer, National Public Radio's Radio Diaries).

FILM SCREENING: BURNT ORANGES WITH SILVIA MALAGRINO
March 5, 2008, 6pm
Columbia College Chicago, Hokin Annex, 623 S. Wabash, 1st FL
Open to the Public & Free of Charge
Winner of the CINE Golden Eagle award and the Aurora Platinum Best of the Show, Burnt Oranges is a poetic documentary by Chicago filmmaker Silvia Malagrino that explores the history of political violence in her native Argentina. Malagrino examines the long-term effects and repercussions of Argentina's 1970s state terrorism through a combination of intimate witness narration, interviews, documentary, and re-created footage. The film is a personal and artistic portrayal of a country's struggles to confront its painful past, and a reminder of the ongoing necessity to defend human rights and democratic values.

POETRY READING: ANTJIE KROG
March 4, 2008, 6pm
Columbia College Chicago, Hokin Annex, 623 S. Wabash, 1st FL

Open to the Public & Free of Charge
Institute Visiting Artist Antjie Krog is a poet, writer, journalist and Extraordinary Professor at the University of the Western Cape. She has published several volumes of poetry and two nonfiction books: Country of My Skull on the South African Truth and Reconciliation Commission; and A Change of Tongue about the transformation in South Africa after ten years. She has been awarded many prestigious awards for non-fiction, translation and poetry in both Afrikaans and English.

THE LITTLE DOG LAUGHED, production by About Face Theatre
January 9-February 17, 2008
Hoover-Leppen Theatre, Center on Halsted, 3656 N. Halsted
The Institute and About Face Theatre continue their collaboration as educational partners. As part of this collaboration, the Institute hosts groups of Columbia College students and other individuals for special performances and participates in pre- and post-discussions.

The Little Dog Laughed, a fast-paced and hilarious look at the world of celebrity, tells the story of a hot Hollywood actor who may be about to win the role of the century, if he can keep his sexuality under wraps. Add to the equation a rent-boy looking for love, his "girlfriend" looking for a home, and a scheming talent agent out to make the deal of a lifetime, this outrageous and steamy comedy is the perfect way to warm up a cold winter night. Written by Douglas Carter Beane and directed by Eric Rosen.

3RD ANNUAL WOMEN IN HIP-HOP
February 7, 2008 6-8pm
Conaway Center, 1104 S. Wabash, 1st Floor

Open to the Public & Free of Charge
This program is part of the Institute's multi-year Gender and Hip-Hop Initiative engaging in critical analysis and public discourse about issues of masculinity, feminism and gender as they are being defined, shaped and applied through this powerful genre.

Celebrating hip-hop performance and activism, the Institute will present the 3rd Annual Women in Hip-Hop program on February 7, 2008. Building upon the success of previous years, the program will feature dynamic performances by socially-conscious female artists, followed by an audience discussion about women, race and gender issues in hip-hop. Headliners include Miami-based Soulflower, Detroit-based Invincible, and Chicago-based AquaMoon & Tha Crew. The discussion will be moderated Jane M. Saks (Executive Director, Ellen Stone Belic Institute for the Study of Women and Gender in the Arts and Media) and Stephanie Shonekan (Director, Black World Studies Program, Columbia College Chicago).

BLACK CREATIVITY 2008 FAMILY DAY
February 2, 2008. 10am-3:30pm.
Museum of Science and Industry, 57th Street & Lakeshore Drive.
The Institute is pleased to be program partner in presenting Black Creativity 2008 Family Day. The year's exhibit, The Magic and Science of Cinema and Television, explores the past, present and future contributions of African Americans in film and television, and the science and technology that make telling their stories possible.

Events & Activities Include:
For Teens:
ANNUAL BLACK CREATIVITY CAREER BOWL, 10am
Combining aspects of Jeopardy! and Who Wants to Be a Millionaire, the Black Creativity Career Bowls are fun and educational games designed to introduce students to the variety of occupations available to them. Students learn about different career fields, while answering trivia questions and competing for prizes.

For Children:
"The Adventures of Teddy P. Brains: Journey into the Rain Forest" 12pm
A new family oriented 3-D animation is aimed at children ages 5-8 and parents who want to expose their children to positive, ethnically diverse images. This colorfully illustrated, 60-minute film tells the story of Teddy P. Brains, his cousin Tempest Wits and his dog D'Artagnan as they go on an adventurous journey of discovery and exploration.

Open to all:
Daughters of the Dust. 11am
Daughters of the Dust is a film written and directed by Julie Dash. It tells the story of a family of African-Americans who have lived for many years on a Southern offshore island, and of how they come together one day in 1902 to celebrate their ancestors before some of them leave for the North. Featuring Cora Lee Day, Kaycee Moore, and Cheryl Lynn Bruce. With the debut of Daughters of the Dust in January 1992, Julie Dash became the first African-American woman to have a full-length general theatrical release in the USA. "O" Magazine included Daughters of the Dust among its 50 Greatest Chick Flicks and in 1999, the Newark Black Film Festival called the film one of the most important cinematic achievements in Black Cinema in the 20th century. Join us for a discussion with Julie Dash at 2pm.

Open to all:
SYMPOSIUM: THEIR EYES WERE WATCHING US: BLACK WOMEN IN FILM AND TELEVISION. 2pm.
This interactive panel discussion traces the historical depiction of Black women in film and television, as well as the century-long battle against objectification and marginalization waged by early and contemporary Black feminists, actresses, and film makers. Speakers: Julie Dash (Daughters of the Dust), and Yvonne Welbon (Sisters In Cinema). Moderated by Lisa Brock (Columbia College Chicago).

The Black Creativity program, which began in 1971, presents exhibits and related programming that recognize African-American achievement.

Visit www.msichicago.org for information on other activities.

OUT AT CHM: SEXUAL POLITICS: FROM THE LAVENDER SCARE TO LARRY CRAIG
January 31, 2008. Reception 5:30pm. Program 6:30pm.
Chicago History Museum, 1601 N. Clark Street
The Institute is a yearly program partner and co-sponsor of the Chicago History Museum's OUT at CHM, an annual series exploring the history of LGBT art, politics and culture in Chicago. This installment explores how the sexuality of gay men repeatedly finds its way to the center of the nation's political attention and how things have changed for gay men and lesbians in the last 50 years. Gay historians David Johnson and Lane Fenreich will give a presentation about a half century of gay men in the public eye.