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Columbia College Chicago
Thomas Mula

Thomas Mula

Thomas Mula

Senior Lecturer

B.F.A., University of Illinois; award-winning actor; director, playwright, makeup artist; winner of Joseph Jefferson Award for The Golem and Sylvia's Real Good Advice; author, Jacob Marley's Christmas Carol
Chicago actor, director, and playwright for more than 30 years. His plays W!, The Golem, and his work on Nicole Hollander's Sylvia's Real Good Advice were all recognized by the Joseph Jefferson Committee; he is also the proud author of Almighty Bob. His novel Jacob Marley's Christmas Carol was published in 1995 by Adams Media; it was a Chicago Tribune bestseller. The audio version was broadcast nationwide on NPR for six seasons; the play received the Cunningham Prize from the Goodman School of Drama at DePaul. It premiered in 1998 at Chicago's Goodman Theatre (also directed by Steve Scott), was Jeff-nominated, and received an After Dark Award. Since then, it has received hundreds of productions nationally and worldwide, including productions in South Africa and Australia.
Some of Mr. Mula's acting credits include Hot Mikado at Drury Lane, for which he received an After Dark Award and a Joseph Jefferson Award; Lawrence in Christine Thatcher's Emma's Child; the Fool in King Lear; Richard III, Caliban, Bottom, Feste, Malvolio, and Prospero; another award-winning solo turn in The Circus Of Dr. Lao; and seven seasons (over 400 performances) as Goodman Theatre's Scrooge. His directing credits include Jeff nominations for Porch and A Life, and the world premiere of Larry Shue's last play, Wenceslas Square in Chicago and at the Queens' Festival in Belfast.
Mula was Artistic Director of the Oak Park Festival Theatre for seven years, directing or appearing in As You Like It, Romeo and Juliet, The Tempest, Richard III, Midsummer Night’s Dream, and his own adaptations of Dr. Faustus and Henry IV pts. I and 2, titled Falstaff. Mula has spent fifteen summers at Peninsula Players in Door County Wisconsin. There he has directed productions of Amadeus, Lion in Winter, Red Herring, and Greetings, among others. He has appeared there in Cabaret, Cherry Orchard, Art, and far too many farces.
Mr. Mula has taught in the Theater Department at Columbia College for more than twenty years, most of them as an Artist-in-Residence. There he has directed Tartuffe; co-directed Ragtime, MacBeth, and Romeo and Juliet with Sheldon.