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Unplug It!
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UnPlug It!

Saving energy is something we can all do that makes a difference. Read below for more tips. 

Have a Green Holiday

 

 

Energy Conservation Facts:

Many appliances continue to draw a small amount of power when they are switched off. These "phantom" loads occur in most appliances that use electricity, such as VCRs, televisions, stereos, computers, and kitchen appliances.

In the average home (and office), 75% of the electricity used to power electronics is consumed while the products are turned off. This can be avoided by unplugging the appliance or using a power strip and using the switch on the power strip to cut all power to the appliance. (US Department of Energy)

Nationally Phantom loads make up about 6% of our entire residential electricity consumption!

Unplugging your electronics when not in use, or using a power strip to shut them down, can eliminate as much as 500 pounds of greenhouse gases each year and trim your electric bill, and that's just for one power strip! (Seattle Power and Light)

 

TURN OFF AND UNPLUG Checklist:
Surge protectors
Printers and photocopiers
Computers
Office equipment
Stereos, lamps
Space Heaters
Micro-waves/coffee pots,
rechargeable items unplugged

 

Energy Saving Tips for Offices: 
(Written by and Ohio University and used with permission from University of Oregon)

Turn On Power Management Features:
To enable computer Power Management Features,
- Windows 95– Select Start, Settings, Control Panel, and Display. Select the Screen Saver tab. Choose a predominantly black screen saver and set it to wait 5 minutes. Click the Low-Power Standby box and set for 10 minutes. Click the Shut Off Monitor box and set for 20 minutes. Click Ok or Apply.

- Windows 98/ME/2000/XP– Select Start, Settings, Control Panel, and Display. Select the Screen Saver tab. Choose a predominantly black screen saver and set it to wait for 5 minutes. Click on Settings to reach the power management settings. Click the Shut Off Monitor box and set for 10 minutes. Click Ok or Apply.

- Windows NT– does not support Energy Star, so you cannot activate the low -power settings through the Control Panel. You still can select a dark desktop background and screen saver. Energy Star still can be activated through the computer’s set-up
program, which varies among computer models. Contact your computer support staff if you need assistance.

- Macintosh– Select System Preferences from the dock (OSX) or click the Apple and select Control Panels (OS9). Select Energy Saver. Under the Sleep tab you can enable your computer, display, and hard drive to go to sleep mode after a period of activity.

 

Common Computer Myths :
(Written by and Ohio University and used with permission from University of Oregon)

Myth: It is bad to turn off the computer.
Truth: Computers are now designed to handle 40,000 on/off cycles. This is considerably more cycles than the average user will initiate in the computer’s 5-7 year life span. Turning your computer off helps reduce heat stress and wear on the system.

Myth: Turning your computer off uses more energy than leaving it on.
Truth: The surge of power used by a CPU to boot up is far less than the energy used by the unit when left on for over 3 minutes.

Myth: Screen savers save energy.
Truth: Screen savers were originally designed to help protect the life span of monochrome monitors which are now technologically obsolete. Most screen savers do not save energy unless they actually turn off the screen or, in the case of laptops, turn off the back light.

Myth: Network connections are lost when a PC goes into low-power/sleep mode.
Truth: Newer computers are designed to sleep on networks to prevent loss of data or connection. CPU’s with Wake on LAN (WOL) technology built-in to network cards can be left in sleep mode overnight to wake-up and receive data packets sent to the unit.

 

Computing the Savings:
(Written by and Ohio University and used with permission from University of Oregon)

A computer left continuously running will emit 2161 pounds of CO2 in a year and cost $45 a year to power at $0.0372 per kWh. (a major cause of global warming).

Turning a computer off at night so it runs only 8 hours a day computes to a reduction of 810 kWh per year, or a 67% yearly savings.

By turning off computer units at night, you can save 9,720,000 kWh per year. This amounts to $360,000 per year saved (for 12,000 units at $0.0372 per kWh).