Fall 2012 / Spring 2013

Faculty News

Stephen Asma (HHSS)


Michelle Barreras and Mary Quest (Education)


Anne Becker (Education)


Jenny Boully (English)


Susan Budde, Jane Cecil, Juana Reyes, Liz Tertell (Education)


Marcelo Caplan (Science and Mathematics)


John Casey (English)


Elizabeth Davis-Berg (Science and Mathematics)


Jim DeRogatis (English)


Lisa Difranza (First-Year Seminar)


James Falzone (FYS)


Lisa Fishman (English)


Deborah Foote (HHSS)


Kelly Forsythe (English)


Angela Folwer (Education)


Mary Pat Garr (Education)


Cheryl Graeff (English)


Ann Hetzel Gunkel (HHSS)


Deborah H. Holdstein (School of Liberal Arts and Sciences)


Dianne Jedlicka and Emily Gaul (Science and Mathematics)


Allan Johnston (English)


Daniel Jordan (Science and Mathematics)


Johnthan Keiser (Science and Mathematics and Academic Affairs)


Azar Khosravani (Science and Mathematics)


Garnett Kilberg Cohen (English)


Aviya Kushner (English)


Robert Lagueux (FYS)


David Lazar (English)


Erin McCarthy (HHSS)


RoseAnna Mueller (HHSS)


Phyllis Nelson (English)


Sarah Odishoo (English)


Dominic Pacyga (HHSS)


Sam Park (English)


Pan Papacosta (Science and Mathematics)


Neil Pagano (School of Liberal Arts and Sciences)


Michelle Rafacz (Science and Mathematics)


Brendan Riley (English)


Pegeen Reichert Powell (English)


Douglas Reichert Powell (English)


Carol Lloyd Rozansky (Education)


John Salovaara and A. Qween Wicks (English)


Christopher Shaw and Daniel Jordan (Science and Mathematics)


Louis Silverstein (HHSS)


Marianne Stallworth (Education)


Steven Teref (English)


Fereshteh Toosi (FYS)


David Trinidad (English)


Susan Tyma (Science and Mathematics)


Koch Unni (Science and Mathematics)


Stan West (English, FYS)


Andrew Whatley (School of Liberal Arts and Sciences)

Stephen Asma (HHSS)

STEPHEN ASMA (HHSS) wrote an article, “Gauging Gender,” that appeared in The Chronicle of Higher Education (October 30, 2011). Dr. Asma was interviewed in October on New Hampshire Public Radio about how the concept of monsters has evolved through the ages. His twelfth book, Against Fairness, will be published by the University of Chicago Press in November, 2012.

 


Michelle Barreras and Mary Quest (Education)

Michelle Barreras and Mary Quest (Education) gave a presentation in November at the Progressive Education Network National Conference, held in Chicago. Their presentation, “Supporting Brain Development in a Progressive Early Childhood Classroom,” focused on brain development during the early childhood years and how the relationships, activities, and environments within a progressive early childhood classroom experience promote healthy brain development. In January, the pair hosted a workshop at the 56th Annual Chicago Metro Association for the Education of Young Children Conference.

 

 


Anne Becker (Education)

Anne Becker (Education) became the new president-elect of the Illinois Art Education Association. In her three-year tenure she will also serve as the association’s president, and then as its past-president. Dr. Becker also had an article, “Computeritis,” published in the Fall, 2011 Kappa Delta Pi New Teacher Advocate magazine. In November, she gave three presentations at the Illinois Art Education Conference, held at Illinois State University. Her first presentation, “VoiceThread,” which she gave with graduate art students Kayla Gale and Janet Carag, addressed how Voice-Thread technology can be used as a creative approach for teachers in the classroom. Her second presentation, “Joining Voices for Advocacy,” focused on how teachers can craft messages in ways that convince others to transform schools and communities for the better. Her third presentation, “Fusing Special Ed with Art Ideas,” which she gave with MARIANNE STALLWORTh (Education) and Christina Jennings (MAT ’11), addressed how teachers can combine art with literacy for students who have educational disabilities.

 


Jenny Boully (English)

Jenny Boully's (English) book, not merely because of the unknown that was stalking toward them (Tarpaulin Sky Press, June, 2011), was named as one of the Notable Books of 2011 by the Academy of American Poets.

 

 


Susan Budde, Jane Cecil, Juana Reyes, Liz Tertell (Education)

Susan Budde, Jane Cecil, Juana Reyes, Liz Tertell (Education), along with two Head Start Cohort graduates (Paloma Jurado and Crystal Perez), presented in January at the 56th Annual Chicago Metro Association for the Education of Young Children Conference. In their panel discussion, “Exploring Possibilities: Head Start Teachers Studying the Reggio Emilia Approach Share Their Journey,” the participants addressed their explorations using the Reggio Emilia Approach in several Head Start classrooms. The panel also reflected on how Columbia’s Early Childhood Education program changed their approaches toward curriculum and the classroom environment.

 


Marcelo Caplan (Science and Mathematics)

Marcelo Caplan (Science and Mathematics) presented two workshops in April at the Illinois 21st Century Community Learning Centers Spring Conference, held at the Tinley Park Convention Center. The titles of his workshops were, “Informal Education Experiences Using Solar Energy as the Umbrella to Promote STEM Learning,” and, “Using Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics to Design Musical Instruments.” In March, Caplan presented the highlights of the Scientists for Tomorrow program at the Convening on Professional Development in Informal Science Education, which was organized by the Center for the Advancement of Informal Science Education in Washington, D.C.

 

 


John Casey (English)

John Casey (English) wrote an article on Stephen Crane’s novel The Red Badge of Courage, published in the fall issue of American Literary Realism. The article was titled, “Searching for a War of One’s Own: Stephen Crane, The Red Badge of Courage, and the Glorious Burden of the Civil War Veteran.” Additionally, in November, Casey presented a paper, “Relics of War: The Image of the Wounded Veteran in Post-Civil War America,” at the Legacy of the Civil War, an interdisciplinary conference held at Chestnut Hill College in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.

 

 


Elizabeth Davis-Berg (Science and Mathematics)

Elizabeth Davis-Berg (Science and Mathematics) had two papers published over the academic year. The first, “Development of the Sea Urchin Arbacia Punctulata in the Presence of the Environmental Toxin Sodium Hypochlorite,” was published in October in the Journal of Environmental Protection. The coauthor of the paper was Meghan Rock (BA ’10), who conducted the research for the paper to complete her minor in Environmental Studies. Dr. Davis-Berg’s second paper, “The Predatory Snail Euglandina rosea Successfully Follows Mucous Trails of Both Native and Non-Native Prey Snails,” was published in December in the international journal Invertebrate Biology.

 


Jim DeRogatis (English)

Jim DeRogatis (English) was quoted in the Washington Post blog The Reliable Source. The blog entry, published in April, addressed musician Ted Nugent’s controversial comments at the annual conference of the National Rifle Association, which lambasted President Obama’s leadership.

 

 


Lisa Difranza (First-Year Seminar)

Lisa Difranza (First-Year Seminar) received a $3,000 grant from the Society for the Arts in Religious and Theological Studies. The grant will assist DiFranza with “The Living News: Shelter,” a theatre production of hers that brings together artists, journalists, and Columbia students with homeless men, women, and children from the Cornerstone Community Outreach, a shelter in Chicago. Inspired by the “Living Newspapers” of the 1930s, the play attempts to raise questions about the social causes that have led to rising homelessness rates.

 

 


James Falzone (FYS)

James Falzone (FYS) was featured in an article published on NewMusicBox.org, a multimedia publication that highlights the work of American composers and improvisers. The article, published in January, describes Falzone as an “accomplished performer, composer, improviser, and educator,” who “pursues a musical vision rooted in the middle ground between the fully notated world of conservatory-trained musicians and the improvisation-based energy of jazz and creative music.” Falzone and his band, KLANG, were included in Improvised Communications in a list of accolades from media throughout 2011. Among KLANG’s accolades are several “Best Of” and “Top 10” lists for its 2011 release, Other Doors. The list also includes a DownBeat magazine critics poll, in which Falzone was named a Rising Star Clarinetist.

 

 


Lisa Fishman (English)

Lisa Fishman's (English) book, FLOWER CART (Ahsahta Press, May, 2011), was named a Notable Book of 2011 by the Academy of American Poets.

 


Deborah Foote (HHSS)

Deborah Foote (HHSS) was quoted in October in an Entertainment Weekly article titled, “Just Cancel The Simpsons Already!?” Foote teaches a course in the Department of Humanities, History, and Social Sciences called, “The Simpsons as Satirical Authors.”

 



Kelly Forsythe (English)

Kelly Forsythe (English) was named a Fall, 2011 Emerging Poet by the Academy of American Poets. She is also an MFA Poetry alumna.

 

 


Angela Folwer (Education)

Angela Folwer (Education) presented a workshop, “Authentic Assessment for the Future,” in January at the 56th Annual Chicago Metro Association for the Education of Young Children Conference. Her workshop focused on the challenges of balancing developmentally appropriate authentic assessment with required formalized assessment and accountability. In March, Fowler was selected to present at the Annual Conference of Early Childhood Education International in Washington, D.C. Her presentation focused on authentic assessment and the childFOLIO iPad application that she developed with Hannah Clemmons (BA ’11), a former student of hers. Fowler was also selected to be a part of an international planning delegation, which met in June in Moss, Norway, to work on the World Forum Foundation’s Global Working Initiative on Children’s Rights.

 


Mary Pat Garr (Education)

Mary Pat Garr (Education) co-presented with ROSITA SANDS (Music) in November at the 4th International Conference of Education, Research, and Innovations in Madrid, Spain. Their presentation, “We Said; They Said: Faculty/Student Perceptions Regarding Aspects of Online Teaching and Learning in Asynchronous Course Environments,” addressed discrepancies that sometimes exist between faculty and student perceptions regarding online teaching and learning at the undergraduate and graduate levels.

 

 

Cheryl Graeff (English)

Cheryl Graeff (English) preformed in October in Waiting for Lefty at the American Blues Theater, which is located in Chicago.

 

 


Ann Hetzel Gunkel (HHSS)

Ann Hetzel Gunkel (HHSS) appeared in a new documentary, Not Quite White. The documentary explores the complicated relationship of Arab and Slavic immigrants with American notions of whiteness. A handful of Chicago-based academics, including Dr. Gunkel, provide contextual and historical insight for the documentary. In addition, Dr. Gunkel’s article, “On Cultural Studies in the Future Tense: Pedagogy and Political Work in Cultural Studies,” was translated into Chinese for the September, 2011 issue of Wen Hua Yen Giu (Cultural Studies), a Beijing Capital University publication.

 


Deborah H. Holdstein (School of Liberal Arts and Sciences)

Deborah H. Holdstein (School of Liberal Arts and Sciences) was appointed to the Council of Colleges of Arts and Sciences’ Standing Committee on Private Institutions for 2012. As a part of this committee, Dean Holdstein will work with deans from other colleges and universities to address issues unique to private institutions. Additionally, the Modern Language Association (MLA) appointed Dean Holdstein to its Publications Committee for a three-year term. This committee is responsible for reviewing and authorizing MLA’s non-periodical publications, including the MLA Handbook and the MLA Style Manual. In April, Dean Holdstein presented at the Conference on College Composition and Communication, an annual meeting of scholars in Rhetoric and Composition, held in St. Louis, Missouri. Her paper, “The Fallacy of Transferability,” addressed whether students transfer the writing they do in their coursework to other writing-related contexts.

 

 


Dianne Jedlicka and Emily Gaul (Science and Mathematics)

Dianne Jedlicka and Emily Gaul (Science and Mathematics) co-wrote a talk titled, “Group Synchronization: The Evolutionary Significance of the Physiology and Behavior of Group Synchronization.” In September, Jedlicka presented the talk at the Annual Lilly Conference on College Teaching in Traverse City, Michigan.

 


Allan Johnston (English)

Allan Johnston (English) poems were published in Caesura, Melusine, r.kv.r.y., Verdad Magazine, Trajectory 3, Epiphany, The New Verse News, White Pelican Review, The Write Room, Third Wednesday, and Shadow and Light, an anthology by the Monadnock Writers’ Group. In February, he presented his paper, “Simulation, Seduction, Education: A Baudrillardian Reading of Post-Modern Education,” at the Society for the Philosophical Study of Education sessions for the American Philosophical Association Central Division Conference in Chicago.

 

 


Daniel Jordan (Science and Mathematics)

Daniel Jordan (Science and Mathematics) is the author of a new book, Exploring Discrete Mathematics with Maple (McGraw-Hill, October, 2011). The book, which is free and available online, is a guide for students on how to use the computer software Maple in order to more deeply understand topics in discrete mathematics. The book is designed for use in parallel with the seventh edition of Kenneth Rosen’s popular textbook, Discrete Mathematics and Its Applications.

 


Johnthan Keiser (Science and Mathematics and Academic Affairs)

Johnthan Keiser (Science and Mathematics and Academic Affairs) presented in February at the Higher Learning Commission’s Making a Difference in Student Learning: Assessment as a Core Strategy workshop, held in St. Charles, Illinois. The presentation, “Using Assessment Technology to Enhance Assessment Practice,” highlighted work from Columbia’s Departments of Theatre and Radio. In April, Dr. Keiser delivered the keynote presentation at the Regional Community College Assessment Conference in Kansas City, Missouri. His presentation, “Models in Concert: Considerations for Assessing Student Learning,” addressed how institutions should simultaneously consider alternative, methodological, and learning outcome models when organizing and implementing assessment practices.

 


Azar Khosravani (Science and Mathematics)

Azar Khosravani (Science and Mathematics) presented in April at the 14th International Conference on Automatic Control Modeling and Simulation in Saint Malo, France. Her paper, “Transformation Invariance of Benford Variables and Their Numerical Modeling,” introduced a family of transformations that leave the digit distribution of a random variable unchanged under exponentiation

Garnett Kilberg Cohen (English)

Garnett Kilberg Cohen (English) essay, “Alzheimer’s Daughter,” was selected as a Notable Essay in the 2011 edition of The Best American Essays. “Alzheimer’s Daughter” first appeared in PoemMemoirStory in 2010. PoemMemoirStory is an annual, all-women’s literary journal published by the University of Alabama at Birmingham.

 

 


Aviya Kushner (English)

Aviya Kushner (English) moderated a panel of literary translation editors at the American Literary Translators Association Conference in November in Kansas City, Missouri. The panel was called, “Watch the Credits: Editors, Critics, and Translators Discuss the Latest and Greatest in Attributing and Promoting Translation.” Kusher’s essay, “Give Me Shelter,” was published in the Winter/Spring issue of Gulf Coast Magazine. The essay addressed efforts to help international refugee writers who come to America.

 


Robert Lagueux (FYS)

Robert Lagueux (FYS) participated in a weeklong art history seminar in June at the Allen Memorial Art Museum at Oberlin College. The seminar aimed to strengthen the teaching of undergraduate art history at colleges and universities.

 

 


David Lazar (English)

David Lazar (English) was interviewed by Bookslut for its February, 2012 issue. The interview was a part of the publication’s new “Constructive Nonfiction” series, which aims to highlight the work of publishers, translators, impresarios, and teachers. In addition, Lazar’s book, The Body of Brooklyn (University of Iowa Press, April, 2003), was reissued in paperback. The book, a series of essays, is a detailed account of Lazar’s upbringing in the 1960s and ’70s. In June, The Body of Brooklyn reached #8 on the Amazon Best Seller’s List in the Family and Childhood category of Biographies and Memoirs, and the book appeared on the list of Best Sellers in Mid-Atlantic United States in the Biographies and Memoirs category. Lazar’s new book of essays, Occasional Desire, will be published by the University of Nebraska Press in the fall of 2013.

 

 

 

Erin McCarthy (HHSS)

Erin McCarthy (HHSS) a featured speaker at the Oral History Association’s Presidential Reception in October, honoring Chicago historian, educator, and author Timuel Black. The reception was held at the Blair-Caldwell African American Research Library in Denver, Colorado.

 

 


RoseAnna Mueller (HHSS)

RoseAnna Mueller's  (HHSS) essay, “Testimonio: Oral Histories Woman to Woman,” was published in the March, 2012 issue of Revista Espaco Academico, as well as in Acta Scientarium: Language and Culture, a publication of State University of Maringá, Brazil. Her chapter, “Maria Eugenia Alonso: The Modern Iphigenia Sacrificed to Society,” was included in The Woman in Latin American and Spanish Literature: Essays on Iconic Characters (Mcfarland, March, 2012).

 

 

Phyllis Nelson (English)

Phyllis Nelson (English), aka Whitney Scott, produced and directed the two-woman show LASER, which she co-wrote with award-winning journalist Catherine Underhill Fitzpatrick. The Chicago-based November literary event was part of Immaculate Conception/St. Joseph Church’s arts and culture programming and drew a capacity crowd.

 

 


Sarah Odishoo (English)

Sarah Odishoo's (English) creative nonfiction essay, “Time in a Bottle,” was selected as a Notable Essay in the 2011 edition of The Best American Essays. “Time in a Bottle” first appeared in 2010 in North Dakota Quarterly, a literary journal published by the University of North Dakota. Odishoo also had “Eat Me: Instructions from the Unseen,” another creative nonfiction essay, published in the spring issue of Zone 3 Journal, a literary journal published twice a year by the Center for the Creative Arts at Austin Peay State University.

 


Dominic Pacyga (HHSS)

Dominic Pacyga (HHSS) appeared in a new documentary, Not Quite White. The documentary explores the complicated relationship of Arab and Slavic immigrants with American notions of whiteness. A handful of Chicago-based academics, including Dr. Pacyga, provide contextual and historical insight for the documentary. In February, he was quoted in a The New Republic story, “Identity Politics in Chicago Takes a Surprising Turn,” which addressed how a recent remapping of Chicago’s wards will benefit the Polish community, despite its waning political clout over the years. In May, Dr. Pacyga was quoted in an Associated Press story about the NATO summit that took place in Chicago. In June, he appeared on WBEZ’s “Afternoon Shift” with Steve Edwards. The two discussed the topic of community and neighborliness.

 


Sam Park (English)

Sam Park's (English) debut novel, This Burns My Heart (Simon & Schuster, June, 2011), was released in paperback in March. The book was also chosen for the Target Emerging Authors program. This Burns My Heart is about a young woman named Soo-Ja who yearns to be South Korea’s first woman diplomat, but instead is asked to make an irredeemable choice that changes her life completely.

 

 


Pan Papacosta (Science and Mathematics)

Pan Papacosta (Science and Mathematics) participated at Oxford College of Emory University’s Institute for Pedagogy in the Liberal Arts 2012. The weeklong conference, which took place in May, is an annual series of workshops and presentations at which participants gain new ideas to expand their teaching methods. In June, Dr. Papacosta presented two papers at the Great Books, Great Questions symposium at the University of King’s College in Halifax, Nova Scotia. His papers were titled, “Enriching the Teaching of Science with Humanities and Arts,” and, “The Challenge and Promise of Liberal Education.” In April, his essay, “We Are Cosmic Nomads,” was published in the April edition of Physics World. The essay explores how the field of physics embraces Heraclitus’s premise that everything in the universe is in a constant state of flux. In October, Dr. Papacosta traveled to Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, to deliver the keynote address of GRAPHICA, an international conference of graphic designers, architects, scientists, and artists. His keynote address was titled, “Expressions of Space. The Science and Art of Space.”

 


Neil Pagano (School of Liberal Arts and Sciences)

Neil Pagano (School of Liberal Arts and Sciences) presented with Deborah H. Holdstein (School of Liberal Arts and Sciences) at the conference of the Council of Colleges of Arts and Sciences, which took place in Montreal in November. Their presentation was titled, “The Dean/Associate Dean Partnership: A Complementary Dynamic.” While at that conference, Dr. Pagano also presented on another panel: “The Role and Impact of Regional Accreditation on Institutional Well-Being.” In September, he and Andrew Whatley (School of Liberal Arts and Sciences) welcomed the local chapter of the National Society of Collegiate Scholars at a packed Stage Two at Columbia. Dr. Pagano gave the keynote address and presented on opportunities for high-achieving students in the School of Liberal Arts and Sciences at Columbia College Chicago, particularly the Honors Program and the Undergraduate Research Mentorship Initiative.

 


Michelle Rafacz (Science and Mathematics)

Michelle Rafacz (Science and Mathematics) authored a new manuscript, which was published in the March, 2012 issue of the American Journal of Primatology, the most widely circulated journal in the field. The article, “Hormonal Correlates of Paternal Care Differences in the Hylobatidae,” is the first of its kind to provide evidence supporting a relationship between male parental care—found in only one of the several closely related lesser ape species—and distinct patterns of the testosterone, estrogen, and cortisol hormones.

 


Brendan Riley (English)

Brendan Riley (English) was quoted in a New York Times Magazine article, “The Everything Guide to Zombies,” which was published in October. In the article, he offers readers recommendations on the most appropriate weapons for killing zombies—should they attempt to take over. “You need a stout weapon to break their heads,” he said in the article. In April, Dr. Riley was elected vice president of the Area Chairs for the Popular Culture Association. In his two-year appointment, he will be responsible for managing and coordinating the individuals who organize panels and recruit presenters for the Popular Culture Association and the American Culture Association. In January, he was quoted in a Newcity article, “Don’t Look So Horrified: The Monstrous Pleasure of Cinema Studies.” The story lists his “Zombies in Popular Media” course as an example of how “popular media is taking its rightful place in academia.” Studying zombies, he said in the story, “help[s] us think about what it means to be human, about the ethics and nature of altruism in times of peril, and about our own mortality.”

 

 


Pegeen Reichert Powell (English)

Pegeen Reichert Powell (English) gave a lecture and conducted a workshop at the University of Wisconsin-Eau Claire in October. The lecture was titled, “Beyond Retention: The Challenge of Educating Students Who Leave,” and the workshop for the first-year writing program there was titled, “Basic Writing: History, Theory, Practice.”

 

 


Douglas Reichert Powell (English)

Douglas Reichert Powell (English) was invited to co-convene a July, 2013 workshop, “Placemaking: Rhetorical Studies and Critical Geography,” at the Rhetoric Society of America summer seminar at the University of Kansas. The workshop will be a conversation about the possibilities for rhetorical scholars to contribute solutions to the problems of “placemaking”—the physical transformation of old spaces. In October, Dr. Powell gave the keynote address at a conference hosted by the Centre for Regional Studies at St. Francis Xavier University in Antigonish, Nova Scotia. The conference was called, “Critical Regionalism: Determinants of Community Sustainability,” and his keynote address was titled, “The Cryptic Space of the Show Cave: A Case Study for Critical Regionalism.”

 

 


Carol Lloyd Rozansky (Education)

Carol Lloyd Rozansky (Education) coauthored an article, “Educational Twinning Across Continents,” with Yehuda Peled, Professor at Western Galilee Academic College and Ohalo Academic College, Israel. The article addresses their research in “educational twinning,” a term used to describe the process of connecting students from different geographical locations and cultures through the sharing of curriculum-based activities—in this case, students in the United States and Israel. The article appears in the summer issue of Academic Exchange Quarterly, a peer reviewed and quarterly academic journal.

 


John Salovaara and A. Qween Wicks (English)

John Salovaara and A. Qween Wicks (English) were awarded the Timothy J. Densmore Faculty Fellowship following the completion of the 2010/2011 Service-Learning Course Conversion workshop, which was facilitated by the Center for Teaching Excellence and the Center for Community Arts Partnerships.

 


Christopher Shaw and Daniel Jordan (Science and Mathematics)

Christopher Shaw and Daniel Jordan (Science and Mathematics) were named editors of Illinois Mathematics Teacher, a peer-reviewed journal that reaches mathematics educators at all grade levels. The Illinois Council of Teachers of Mathematics publishes the journal, which aims to create new teaching ideas for mathematicians to use in their classrooms.

 

 


Louis Silverstein (HHSS)

Louis Silverstein's (HHSS) Letter to the Editor was published in May in The Chronicle of Higher Education. In his letter, Dr. Silverstein expressed his concerns surrounding online courses, and how taking them can lead to fewer situations where a professor can identify and help a struggling student. Also in May, Dr. Silverstein presented at the International Journal of Arts & Sciences Multidisciplinary Conference, held at Harvard University. His presentation, “Encountering Life’s Endings,” focused on the philosophical perspectives and stories of death and dying. Dr. Silverstein teaches a course in the Department of Humanities, History, and Social Sciences titled, “Death and Dying.”

 

 

Marianne Stallworth (Education)

Marianne Stallworth's (Education) book, School Staff Perception of Professional Development, Two Case Studies, was published in March by Lambert Academic Publishing. The book is a discourse on her research into the perceptions of teachers, related service providers, and administrators relative to the effectiveness of professional development models and training opportunities to which they were exposed.

 

 


Steven Teref (English)

Steven Teref (English) was one of two part time faculty members at the college to receive the 2012 Excellence in Teaching Award.

 


Fereshteh Toosi (FYS)

Fereshteh Toosi (FYS) participated in a panel discussion at Threewalls gallery in Chicago titled, “Rooted: Food and Farming Initiatives as Regional Artworks.” The panel discussion, which took place in May, examined ways that innovative agricultural and culinary projects can create new understandings of spaces, ideals, tools, and relationships. In December, she presented her paper, “Oral History through Touch and Sound: Multisensory Design for People with Low or No Vision,” at the Sensory Worlds conference at the University of Edinburgh, in Scotland. Toosi was also the recipient of two grants for her oral history project, GARLIC & GREENS, which focuses on food and family heritage: She was awarded a $2,500 interdisciplinary arts grant from the Illinois Arts Council and a $6,000 grant from the Propeller Fund.

 


David Trinidad (English)

David Trinidad (English) had two projects named as Notable Books of 2011 by the Academy of American Poets. The first, Dear Prudence: New and Selected Poems (Turtle Point Press, September, 2011), features his own poems. The second, A Fast Life: The Collected Poems of Tim Dlugos (Nightboat Books, May, 2011), was edited by Trinidad. In June, A Fast Life won the Lambda Literary Award for Gay Poetry. In September, Trinidad’s poem “Evening Twilight” was featured on the Web site VerseDaily.org.

 


Susan Tyma (Science and Mathematics)

Susan Tyma (Science and Mathematics) was one of two part-time faculty members at the college to receive the 2012 Excellence in Teaching Award.

Koch Unni (Science and Mathematics)

Koch Unni (Science and Mathematics) had a new variety of green peppers he hybridized named after him and internationally patented. The peppers, KOCHTERRII, were sold for the first time in April at the Green and Growing Fair at the Garfield Park Conservatory in Chicago.

 


Stan West (English, FYS)

Stan West (English, FYS) presented at the National Association of African American Studies conference in Baton Rouge, Louisiana, in February. His paper was titled, “Is Self-Loathing a Prerequisite to Teach My ‘Blues as Literature’ class?”

 


Andrew Whatley (School of Liberal Arts and Sciences)

Andrew Whatley (School of Liberal Arts and Sciences) became the faculty advisor for the Columbia College Chicago Chapter of the National Society of Collegiate Scholars (NSCS), an honor society for high-achieving students. In September, Whatley joined NEIL PAGANO (School of Liberal Arts and Sciences) to welcome the local chapter of the NSCS to a packed Stage Two at Columbia College Chicago. Whatley emphasized the myriad experiences available to Columbia students within LAS, and he also shared information on Teach for America, a highly competitive program for college graduates who commit to two years of teaching in low-income urban and rural schools.