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Asian Pacific American Heritage Month 2013
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Asian Pacific American Heritage Month 2013

Asian Pacific American Heritage Month 2013: Chicago Roots logo

Hello, Columbia College Chicago!

I am proud to announce our celebration of Asian Pacific American Heritage Month 2013: Chicago Roots! We have an outstanding lineup of programs that honor our community’s vibrance and contributions to the arts and media.

For us, “Asian Pacific American” includes a vast spectrum of ethnic heritages: Southeast Asian, West Asian (Arab or Middle Eastern), South Asian, East Asian, Pacific Islander, Central Asian, Hapa, and those who identify as multiracial. We want everyone to understand that Asia and the Pacific Islands stretch from the Philippines to Palestine, and Mongolia to Hawai'i. We are just as diverse as we are united—in our traditions, our history, and our experiences in this country.

This month we celebrate artists and activists with Chicago roots. Anida Yoeu Ali is a pioneer in the Chicago APA arts community, and this month she brings us new work reflecting her time working and creating with the Khmer American exiled community in Cambodia. Spoken word and theater artist Kelly Zen-Yie Tsai comes back to her hometown to share FORMOSA, her new solo show examining cultural identity, beauty, globalization, and plastic surgery via the history of Barbie doll manufacturing in Taiwan. On April 23 we celebrate the work of our very own Columbia students at the Asian Student Organization’s annual A2 Art Fair: Icons & Heroes.

It’s going to be an amazing month! We hope you’ll join our APA faculty, staff, and students on April 2 for a special Food for Thought lunch to kick off the festivities!

With gratitude,
Ramona Gupta
Coordinator of Asian American Cultural Affairs
rgupta@colum.edu
312.369.8664

 

ASIAN PACIFIC AMERICAN HERITAGE MONTH KICKOFF
Food for Thought: Chicago Icons & Heroes

Tuesday, April 2
12:00pm - 1:30pm
Multicultural Affairs Conference Room, 618 S. Michigan Ave., 4th floor

Join Columbia College Chicago's office of Asian American Cultural Affairs for its monthly Food for Thought and the kickoff for Asian Pacific American Heritage Month!

We’ll be discussing our Chicago APA icons and heroes while sampling food from different Asian cultures with APA students, faculty, and staff.

All Columbia students, faculty, and staff are welcome!
Seating is limited – first-come, first-served.

RSVP to rgupta@colum.edu by 9am Monday, Apr. 1.


Food for Thought

 

BOLLYWOOD DANCE WORKSHOP
Tuesday, April 2
6:00pm - 7:00pm
Stage Two, 618 S. Michigan Ave., 2nd floor

Learn the fun moves you see in your favorite Bollywood movies! Balle Balle!

Led by visiting artist Shyamala Moorty of the Los Angeles-based Post Natyam Collective.

Open to all Columbia students, staff, and faculty. No experience required!

This event is co-sponsored by Asian American Cultural Affairs and the Dance Department.

 Bollywood Dance Workshop with Post Natyam Collective

 

HYBRID IDENTITY IN DANCEMAKING 
featuring Cynthia Ling Lee and Shyamala Moorty of the Post Natyam Collective

Wednesday, April 3, 2013
1:30 – 2:50pm

Dance Center, 1306 S. Michigan Ave., Room 106
 

Join visiting artists Lee and Moorty for a special lecture about their unique, transnational artistic practice. Open to all Columbia students, faculty, and staff.

 

BRAIDING RIVERS FESTIVAL: STEREOTYPE
featuring Cynthia Ling Lee and Shyamala Moorty of the Post Natyam Collective
Curated by Links Hall Artistic Associate & Columbia Professor Emma Draves

Friday, April 5, 8:00pm
Saturday, April 6, 8:00pm
Sunday, April 7, 7:00pm
Links Hall, 3111 N. Western Ave.

All Columbia students can get tickets for only $5 by emailing edraves@colum.edu!

 The Post Natyam Collective, a transnational, web-based coalition of women artists who creatively and critically engage South Asian dance, will be performing at Links Hall April 5-7 as part of the Braiding Rivers Festival.

The opening weekend of this three-weekend festival celebrates the work of Chicago’s Silk Road Rising theater company and artists from Los Angeles’ Post Natyam Collective.

Blowing apart cultural stereotypes, this evening of interdisciplinary performance rewrites Indian dance tradition with humor, craft, and a critical edge. “What’s Your Stereotype?” parodies and personalizes received gender and cultural roles in a thought-provoking mixture of contemporary Indian dance, theater, multimedia, and audience interaction.

This Asian Pacific American Heritage Month: Chicago Roots event is brought to you by Asian American Cultural Affairs and the Dance Department at Columbia College Chicago. Tickets for Columbia students have been subsidized by a generous grant from Art + Activism: Critical Encounters.

Braiding Rivers Festival with Post Natyam Collective

 

GENERATION RETURN: ART + JUSTICE POST-GENOCIDE AND POST-9/11
featuring Anida Yoeu Ali
Tuesday, April 9
6:30pm - 8:30pm
HAUS
at the Quincy Wong Center for Artistic Expression, 623 S. Wabash Ave., 1st floor
Free and Open to the Public

Artist, Writer, and Global Agitator Anida Yoeu Ali upholds the belief that art is a critical tool for individual and societal transformation.

Born in Cambodia and raised in Chicago, she returned to live in Cambodia in 2011 after nearly 3 decades away. She is part of a returning diaspora of artists and thinkers creating narratives of Cambodia beyond war and poverty.

Her performance and video works with collaborative media lab Studio Revolt and the Khmer Exiled American community provocatively consider the diasporic past/present contours of the Cambodian American experience.

This Asian Pacific American Heritage Month event is brought to you by Asian American Cultural Affairs at Columbia College Chicago and co-sponsored by Columbia College Chicago's Asian Student Organization, One Tribe, International Student Affairs, and Ellen Stone Belic Institute for the Study of Women and Gender in the Arts and Media; and UIC Asian American Resource and Cultural Center, UIC Asian American Studies Program, UIC Asian Studies Program, and UIC International Studies Program.

Generation Return featuring Anida Yoeu Ali

 

FORMOSA: A SHOW ABOUT BEAUTY, BODY, CULTURE, AND...BARBIE
featuring Kelly Zen-Yie Tsai
Tuesday, April 16
6:30pm - 8:30pm
HAUS at the Quincy Wong Center for Artistic Expression, 623 S. Wabash Ave., 1st floor
Free and Open to the Public

Inspired by the history of Barbie doll manufacturing in Taiwan, FORMOSA weaves a tragicomic tale across time and space tracking Vega, a failed Spanish colonizer in Taiwan during the mid-1600s; Harajuku Barbie Maybe, a present-day Nicki Minaj-knock-off Asian American femcee; Pinky, a present-day 8-year-old Chinese American adoptee in Manhattan; and Hsiu-Mei, a Taiwanese factory worker in the Barbie doll factory during the late 1960s-1980s. FORMOSA fuses spoken word, movement, and theater exploring the ways that Barbie, beauty, body, culture, and labor connect.

 Chicago-born artist Kelly Zen-Yie Tsai is an award-winning spoken word poet, playwright, and filmmaker whose work has been featured at over 500 venues worldwide including the White House, Apollo Theater in Harlem, Kennedy Center, Lincoln Center, BAM, Tyra Banks’ Flawsome Ball, & three seasons of “HBO Def Poetry.” Award recipient of the Illinois Arts Council, Asian American Arts Alliance, New York Foundation for the Arts, Asian Women Giving Circle, and Lower Manhattan Cultural Council, Kelly has been profiled on Idealist in NYC’s Top 40 NYC’ers Who Make Positive Social Change, AngryAsianMan.com’s “30 Most Influential Asian Americans Under 30,” and HBO’s “East of Main Street: Asians Aloud.”

This Asian Pacific American Heritage Month event is brought to you by Asian American Cultural Affairs at Columbia College Chicago and co-sponsored by Columbia College Chicago's Asian Student Organization, One Tribe, and Ellen Stone Belic Institute for the Study of Women and Gender in the Arts and Media.

Formosa featuring Kelly Zen-Yie Tsai

 

ASIAN PACIFIC AMERICAN FACULTY/STAFF MEETING
Thursday, April 18
12:00pm - 1:30pm
Multicultural Affairs Conference Room, 618 S. Michigan Ave., 4th floor

Join us for the second meeting of a newly formed APA faculty and staff organization. We will discuss the group's goals, mission, and research agenda while getting to know each other. Please bring your lunch. RSVP by Tuesday, April 16 to Ramona Gupta at rgupta@colum.edu.

A2 ART FAIR: ICONS & HEROES
hosted by Asian Student Organization
Tuesday, April 23
6:00pm - 9:00pm
HAUS at the Quincy Wong Center for Artistic Expression, 623 S. Wabash Ave., 1st floor

Join the Asian Student Organization for its annual visual and performing arts showcase! Our work this year is inspired by our Asian Pacific American civil rights and cultural icons and heroes. Journey with us as we explore our community’s history and contribute to its future.

 

Also check out these other great programs happening at Columbia during the month of April!

10 Years After the U.S. Invasion: The Iraqi Press
Wednesday, April 10
6:30pm - 8:00pm
C-101 Gallery, 33 E. Congress, 1st floor

A special panel of journalists provide a first-hand perspective of Iraq 10 years after the U.S. Invasion. This star-studded panel features Azer Hussen, former editor-in-chief of Iraq's first independent student newspaper; Mohamed Husain, former head of newsroom for the New York Times Baghdad bureau; and Anass Al Bayati, columnist, TV producer and director of program administration for the Iraqi Mutual Aid Society in Chicago.

Moderated by Prof. Jackie Spinner, former Baghdad bureau chief for the Washington Post, and founder of AUIS Voice at the American University of Iraq in Sulaimani.

Sponsored by the Journalism Department at Columbia College, the Chicago Headline Club, and American Journalism Review.

10 Years After the U.S. Invastion: The Iraqi Press

 

Screening: 5 Broken Cameras
Tuesday, April 23
6:00pm - 8:30pm
Film Row Cinema, 1104 S. Wabash Ave., 8th floor
FREE and Open to the Public

Academy Award Nominee: Best Documentary Feature
Winner: World Cinema Directing Award, Sundance Film Festival
Winner: Special Jury Award and Audience Award, International Documentary Film Festival

Brief Audience Q&A to follow will be moderated by Iymen Chehade, Columbia College Chicago, Department of Humanities, History and Social Science, lecturer on the Israeli-Palestinian Conflict and the Middle East; and Lynn Pollack, Jewish Voice for Peace member, Chicago-steering Committee and Co-Convener of the Chicago Faith Coalition on Middle East Policy.

An extraordinary work of both cinematic and political activism, 5 Broken Cameras is a deeply personal, first-hand account of non-violent resistance in Bil’in, a West Bank village threatened by encroaching Israeli settlements. Shot almost entirely by Palestinian farmer Emad Burnat, who bought his first camera in 2005 to record the birth of his youngest son, the film was assembled by Burnat and Israeli co-director Guy Davidi. Structured around the violent destruction of each one of Burnat’s cameras, the filmmakers’ collaboration follows one family’s evolution over five years of village turmoil, as olive trees are bulldozed, protests intensify, and lives are lost.

Co-Presenters: Ellen Stone Belic Institute for Women and Gender in the Arts and Media, Columbia College Chicago and Jewish Voice for Peace. Presentation Partners: Columbia College Chicago, Education Department, Film & Video Department, First Year Seminar, Department of Humanities, History and Social Sciences, International Student Organization and Multicultural Affairs.

5 Broken Cameras