Semester in LA

Credited Courses

Journalism

Diversity in the Media: Gender, Race, and Age in Hollywood (LA)

53-4670L (3 credit hours)

Topical courses examine how mainstream and alternative media cover issues of gender and sexuality, race, religion, and socio-political and ethnic diversity. Courses also look at the journalistic tradition of covering voiceless or disenfranchised groups, such as the homeless, imprisoned, or disabled. Topics have included Alternative Press, Women and the Media, Black Journalism in America, and Covering Religion.

Reporting Entertainment News (LA)

53-4550L (4 credit hours)

This advanced news and business reporting class focuses on trends, personalities, and popular culture in the world of arts, entertainment, and media.

Covering the Entertainment Industries

53-4551L (4 credit hours)

This course examines the business organization, legal aspects, and current practices of the entertainment businesses. It is intended to ground journalism students in the history, trends, terminology, and challenges of the music, film, television, and other entertainment businesses. It will examine how technology shapes the entertainment and news media environment. The seminar will require critical thinking and writing skills to analyze business decisions and their impact on the entertainment industries and the public discourse they influence.

Location: LA

53-4555L (1 credit hours)

This course is a journalistic primer on Los Angeles. It covers the forces, natural and man-made, past and present, that created modern-day Los Angeles-an understanding that is essential for reporters who wish to knowledgeably cover this complicated city and the entertainment industries based here.

Producing

Concept, Pitch, Sales

24-4630L (3 credit hours)

This class examines how films are sold to major studios, producers, and distributors. Films, of course, start as ideas. In this class, the student learns how to shape the idea for delivery in a pitch session; how to find the appropriate executives to pitch to and how to negotiate a deal. This class will emphasize not only the theory of the pitch but its practice as well.

Studio Producing/Los Angeles

24-4631L (3 credit hours)

Students learn the function and culture of the studio system as it is currently structured and practiced. Topics include development, reading for coverage, complex financing, and distribution. Class also explores the various roles of executives in the film and television industries and their relationships with agents, legal entities, and intellectual property.

The Line Producer/Los Angeles

24-4632L (3 credit hours)

Students examine elements of pre-production, production, and post production in the film and television industries from the perspective of the role of the line-producer. Topics include scheduling, budgeting, and line-producing in the context of large budgets and complex projects. Below-the-Line jobs and relationships with crew and guilds are covered.

Research and Analysis of the Film and Television Industries

24-4633L (3 credit hours)

Students learn to perform sophisticated research and analysis of selected production and distribution companies in the film and television industries. Use of specific industry databases and trade journals is covered as well as the use of primary and secondary source research. Students will learn how to use research to prepare analysis and professional reports. This course is partially conducted online and begins prior to students arriving in Los Angeles.

MFA Producing

Long Form Narrative Package

24-6619L (2 credit hours)

This course is a hands-on approach based on th principles learned and materiald developed in Acquisition, Development & Presentation, and Long-Form Narrative Development, concentrating on a final pitch and oral presentation with a thesis binder consisting of multiple projects and corresponding selling strategies. Coursework will include professionally-modeled research that identifies project-specific buyers, talents, and financing tactics. Students will package at least one project from their slate developed in Long-Form Narrative Development.

Business Affairs

24-6611L (3 credit hours)

Business Affairs is a Log Angeles-based seminar that introduces students to market trends in financing, ranging from entrepreneurial business pan driven investment scenarios to more conventional distributor-driven opportunities that include fundamentals in the roles of agents and managers. Students develop negotiating skills and examine the art of effective negotions.

The Entrepreneurial Producer

24-6616L (3 credit hours)

This Los Angeles-based advanced workshop will provide a detailed examination of the producer's role of "packaging" with a practical emphasis on attaching talent, calibrating trends in international co-productions, soft monies & tax incentives, international sales & pre-sales, and film markets. Students will also have the opportunity to explore "packaging projects" in Television and New Media.

Comedy Writing for Television

Writer's Roundtable in LA

40-3820L (3 credit hours)

This course builds and emphasizes the students' skills for the development of an oppropriate storyline for the one-hour format. Students will explore a variety of television genres, and ultimately write a finished television script utilizing the current computer software programs for professional screenwriting.

Prerequisites:

  • 40-2201 The Television Producer
  • 40-2202 Writing For Television

Pitching Series Concepts in LA

40-3821L (3 credit hours)

Students participating in the Los Angeles program will have the opportunity to learn and practice the fine art of "the pitch," first in the classroom environment, and finally to prominent television writers, agents, and producers.

Prerequisites:

  • 40-2201 The Television Producer
  • 40-2202 Writing For Television

Analyzing Sitcom Structure in LA

40-3824L (3 credit hours)

Students will analyze a variety of situation comedies currently in production. A variety of speakers from the industry will illuminate the shows, describing how they were developed, written, and produced.

Prerequisites:

  • 40-2201 The Television Producer
  • 40-2202 Writing For Television

Conceiving and Writing the Situation Comedy Show Bible in LA

40-3825L (3 credit hours)

Students will develop and write a rudimentary show bible for a situation comedy. Focus will be paid to the process of positioning a show for current market situation.

Prerequisites:

  • 40-2201 Television Producer
  • 40-2202 Writing for Television

Drama Writing for Television

Writers' Roundtable in LA

40-3820L (3 credit hours)

This course builds and emphasizes the writer's skills for the development of an appropriate storyline for the one-hour format. Students will explore a variety of television genres and ultimately write a finished television script utilizing current software programs for professional writing.

Prerequisites:

  • 40-2201 The Television Producer
  • 40-2202 Writing for Television
  • Permission of the department

Pitching Series Concept in LA

40-3821L (3 credit hours)

Students participating in the Los Angeles program will have the opportunity to learn and practice the fine art of "the pitch," first in the classroom environment, and finally to prominent television writers, agents, and producers.

Prerequisites:

  • 40-2201 The Television Producer
  • 40-2202 Writing for Television
  • Permission of the department

Conceiving and Writing the Show Bible in LA

40-3822L (3 credit hours)

Students will develop and write a rudimentary show bible for a one-hour program in a genre of their choice. Focus will be on the process of positioning the show for current market situation.

Prerequisites:

  • 40-2201 The Television Producer
  • 40-2202 Writing for Television
  • Permission of the department

Analyzing Dramatic Structure in LA

40-3823L-01 (3 credit hours)

Students will analyze a variety of one-hour episodic dramas currently in production. A variety of speakers from the industry will illuminate the shows, describing how they were developed, written, and produced.

Prerequisites:

  • 40-2201 The Television Producer
  • 40-2202 Writing for Television
  • Permission of the department

Screenwriting

Screenwriting III: Senior Thesis in LA

24-3711L (3 credit hours)

Course emphasizes the definition of a suitable story, the exploration of genre, and the writing of a feature film script utilizing story development and writing tools such as computer software programs.

Screenwriting Workshops: Reading for Coverage in LA

24-2731L (3 credit hours)

Students will read and analyze a variety of scripts preparing coverage as practice for entry-level positions in screenwriting or preparing for jobs in Hollywood development offices.

Topics in Screenwriting: Hollywood Business in LA

24-3731L (3 credit hours)

Students participating in the Los Angeles program will take part in a lecture series analyzing the business of screenwriting in Hollywood. Some of the lectures will be prominent screenwriters, agents, and producers.

Screen Treatment and Presentation II in LA

24-3741L (3 credit hours)

Course gives students the opportunity to learn and practice methods of pitching and marketing film ideas, primarily using the students' scripts from Screenwriting III (24-3711, taken concurrently).

Prerequisites:

  • 24-2710 Screenwriting II (B or better)
  • Permission of the department

Directing

Directing in the Studio System

24-4301L (4 credit hours)

This Los Angeles-based course explores the role of the director within the studio system. The course examines relationships with producers, writers, and studio executives. Students learn the importance of budgets and schedules and their effect on the creative process. Leadership skills and team building are addressed. Students will explore the role of an agent and employment possibilities.

Prerequisites:

  • 24-3302 Directing II

The Professional Director

24-4302L (4 credit hours)

This Los Angeles-based course looks at the director at work. A variety of professional film and television directors will rotate through the course showing how directors analyze and breakdown text, prepare for shooting, rehearse actors, and block action for camera. Students will critique and analyze dailies with professional directors.

Prerequisites:

  • 24-3302 Directing II

Casting, Blocking, and Directing Actors

24-4303L (4 credit hours)

This Los Angeles-based course teaches students how to cast for film and television, rehearse these actors, block action for the camera, and shoot the scene. Appropriate coverage for editing is explored.

Prerequisites:

  • 24-3302 Directing II

Adaptation - Screenwriting

Adaptation II in LA

24-2716L (3 credit hours)

Students develop a previously completed work of prose (non-scripted material such as a short story, novel, etc.) into an expanded Step Outline and then a Visual Treatment. The Outlining process will involve breaking down the prose, streamlining it into visuals and essential dialogue, and registering the Step Outline with the WGA. Based on feedback from a Story Editor, the students will revise their Outline and write a Visual Treatment to be pitched to Development Executives at the end of the program. Before attending the program, students must demonstrate that they have the rights to the prose material, either because they are the originators of the prose or because they have documented permission to adapt another person's material.

Prerequisites:

  • Permission of the department
  • Ideally: Script Analysis, Screenwriting II, and Adaptation

Acquiring Intellectual Properties for Adaptation in LA

24-2718L (3 credit hours)

This course is designed to help students better understand the process of optioning copyrighted work by other writers. During the first week, students will research and choose three (3) works of prose by other writers for optioning. Taking their first choice, students will attempt to locate the rights through publishers, lawyers, agents, etc. There will be weekly individual meetings to check on student progress. If a student's first choice falls through (due to already being optioned or too many legalities), student will try to option their second choice (and so on).

Prerequisites:

  • Permission of the department
  • Ideally: Screen Treatment & Presentation

Screenwriting Workshop: Coverage of Adapted Screenplays in LA

24-2732L (3 credit hours)

Students will read and analyze a variety of source stories, scripts based on those source stories, and films made from those scripts as a way to learn adapting techniques. Students will learn and prepare Prose Coverage and Script Coverage as a method of analyzing adaptation approaches and as practice for entry-level positions in screenwriting or preparing for jobs in Hollywood development offices.

Topics in Screenwriting: Techniques and Business of Adaptation in LA

24-3732L (3 credit hours)

Students participating in the Los Angeles program will take part in a lecture series of prominent screenwriters and producers who have adapted material as well as lawyers, agents, and producers who will discuss the legal and business side of optioning and adapting pre-existing material.

Entertainment Marketing

Survey Entertainment Business

54-3710L (4 credit hours)

This course meets in Los Angeles. It introduces students to the trade communication vehicles central to the marketing and public relations activities associated with the film and entertainment industries. Course provides an introduction to trade media as a form of research. Course discusses select themes reflecting areas of student interest for workshop projects. Student may elect to focus on individual film productions or trends in entertainment publicity.

Entertainment Marketing Communication

54-3711L (4 credit hours)

This course meets in Los Angeles. It covers all forms of entertainment marketing and publicity, including how to prepare a marketing and publicity campaign for industry events and products. Course offers an overview of employment opportunities in entertainment marketing communication and provides regular interaction with industry leaders through guest lectures and field trips.

Entertainment Marketing Communication Workshop

54-3712L (4 credit hours)

This course meets in Los Angeles. It challenges students to conduct appropriate research, planning, development, and creation of a marketing/publicity campaign for a select "product" in the film/entertainment field.

Scoring for Film

Semester in LA: Film Scoring

32-3248L (9 credit hours)

Course is an intensive immersion experience for undergraduate composers consisting of three areas of study: Composing for Film; the History and Aesthetics of Film Music; and the Business and Politics of Film Music. Students spend four weeks in Los Angeles where they will meet 8 hours each day with additional access to film scoring labs in the evenings and on weekends. Students receive an historical review and analysis of major film scores, with an emphasis on the symphonic film score, especially those of Steiner, Korngold, Herrman, Bernstein, Goldsmith, Morricone, Newman, and others. Students also hear lectures from prominent professionals in the industry (composers, orchestrators, copyists, music editors, music supervisors, chief executives, agents, contractors), who cover the major aspects of the professional world of scoring for films. Finally, students compose original music (underscores) for three short scenes from contemporary films. Two of the scenes are scored using Musical Instrument Digital Interface, and the third is recorded by a professional orchestra. Students use Apple's Logic Pro as a composing tool (the industry standard) as well as the Garritan Personal Orchestra. Scores and parts for the final recording are prepared using Finale. Student work is critiqued and assessed by the faculty of the program and industry professionals, with opportunities for students to critique each other's work.

Prerequisite:

  • 32-3212 Composition IV

Transmedia & Cross-Platform Development

Transmedia & Cross-Platform Development: Film

75-3003AL (3 credit hours)

This interdepartmental Semester in Los Angeles course brings students from various backgrounds together to develop their IP Bibles into a feature film project.

Prerequisite:

  • Permission of the department

Transmedia & Cross-Platform Development: Games

75-3003BL (3 credit hours)

This interdepartmental Semester in Los Angeles course brings students from various backgrounds together to develop their IP Bibles into material for the game industry. Each student will develop one piece of material, such as a short game or game sequence that incorporates at least one extensive dialogue tree and substantive narrative content.

Prerequisite:

  • Permission of the department

Transmedia & Cross-Platform Development: TV

75-3003CL (3 credit hours)

This interdepartmental Semester in Los Angeles course brings students from various backgrounds together to develop their IP Bibles into material for a television series. Each student will develop the various components of a series bible.

Prerequisite:

  • Permission of the department

Developing the Transmedia & Cross-Platform Bible

75-3003DL (3 credit hours)

This Semester in Los Angeles course offering from the school of Media Arts will bring students from various programs together to create original or adapted material for film, television, and the gaming industries. Each student will develop an Intellectual Property (IP) Bible for an original concept or previously undeveloped intellectual property, with the intention to create plat-form appropriate materials for film, a television series, and a game. Students from Film & Video, Television, and Interactive Arts and Media will be encouraged to apply, but the class is open to other qualified students as well.

Prerequisite:

  • Permission of the department

Fashion Studies: Styling and Costuming for Media, TV, Film & Entertainment

Research, Networking, and Portfolio Development

27-3961L (4 credit hours)

This course is integrated with courses 27-3962 and 27-3963 and is taught at Raleigh Studios in Hollywood, California for an intensive five weeks. Students will implement industry research techniques that will serve as the foundation of a presentation to industry professionals. This study will also include exploration of costuming employment opportunities in the various media and entertainment industries. Students are expected to complete a professional portfolio for costume design and/or costume supervision.

Prerequisite:

  • 27-1610 Fundamentals Fashion Design

Costume Supervision for TV, Film, and Entertainment

27-3962L (4 credit hours)

This course is integrated with courses 27-3961 and 27-3963 and taught at Raleigh Studios in Hollywood, California for an intensive five weeks. Students will learn how to develop a budget for costume production and/or acquisition manually and electronically and present the plan at a production meeting. Students will also learn the logistics of costume supervision such as calling actors, getting sizes, performing fittings, coordinating shooting schedules and costume needs, and organizing wardrobe trailers.

Prerequisite:

  • 27-1610 Fundamentals Fashion Design
  • Permission of the department

Costume Design for TV, Film, and Entertainment

27-3963L (4 credit hours)

This course is integrated with courses 27-3961 and 27-3962 and taught at Raleigh Studios in Hollywood, California for an intensive five weeks. Students will learn industry design techniques that they will incorporate into their portfolios and final presentations to industry professionals.

Prerequisite:

  • 27-1610 Fundamentals Fashion Design
  • Permission of the department

Acting

Acting

31-3975LJ (2 credit hours)

This course is designed to give BA and BFA theatre majors a practical and applicable experience towards pursuing a career as a film or television actor in Los Angeles. It is a highly competitive business, and the actor who is prepared to face these challenges has a much better chance of succeeding. Meeting in Los Angeles, this course will provide actors with a ten day, hands-on experience. Now being offered twice per school year (January & June), students will meet with some of the best Los Angeles has to offer, including agents, managers, acting coaches and casting directors. Classes will consist of lectures, demonstrations, off campus field trips, Q&As, and performances. This class is offered  exclusively for all theatre (acting) majors in their senior year.

Prerequisite:

  • Improv Techniques I ("C" or Better)
  • Text Analysis ("C" or Better)
  • Acting II: Character & Ensemble ("C" or Better)
  • Voice Training for the Actor II ("C" or Better)
  • Permission of the Department

*** To apply to the acting program, you must contact the instructor Jason Buyer at: jbuyer@colum.edu.

Animation

Animation

26-3000LJ (2 credit hours)

This course offers students the opportunity to explore career opportunities at major animation studios in Hollywood. Throughout the week in Los Angeles, students are given tours of several studios, learn requirements for employment opportunities (internships and full-time positions), and have their portfolios reviewed by recruiters and industry professionals. Students will submit a paper detailing the overall experience and will also write a self-assessment based on professional feedback given to them over the course of the week.

Prerequisite:

  • Permission of the department

Post Production + Editing

Post Production + Editing

26-3000LJ (2 credit hours)

This course offers students the opportunity to explore career paths in Post Production in Hollywood. Students will meet Post professionals and receive tours of post facilities in a variety of forms, acquainting them with the steps for transitioning from an academic life to a professional one. Professional employment opportunities (internships and full-time positions) will be emphasized. Students will submit a paper detailing their overall experience and a self-assessment based on feedback given throughout the course.

Prerequisite:

  • Permission of the department