Cinema Professor's New Film Wins First-Ever Library of Congress Prize For Documentary

Tim Hardin, who has been an associate professor at Columbia since 1998, was recognized by the Library of Congress last month for his cinematography work on his new feature-length documentary, "Flannery."

Associate Professor of Cinema and Television Arts, Ted Hardin, has been recognized by the Library of Congress for his cinematography work on the new documentary "Flannery."

The feature-length biography, based on 20th century southern writer Flannery O'Connor, won the first-ever Library of Congress Lavine/Ken Burns Prize for Film. The filmmakers were also presented with a $200,000 finishing grant from the National Endowment for the Humanities and other major donors.

The award was presented to Hardin at the Library of Congress on Oct. 17. The award is a new, annual prize that recognizes documentaries for use of original research and compelling narrative to tell stories that highlight some aspect of American history. Eighty films were submitted for consideration and "Flannery" was the winner out of six finalists.

Hardin, who has been an associate professor at Columbia since 1998, is a film producer and director of photography whose work has been featured on the BBC and The New York Times.

Hardin has collaborated with "Flannery" editor Elizabeth Coffman on numerous experimental shorts and documentaries. The two are currently working on a documentary called "Venice is Thinking" about the effects of climate change in Venice, Italy.

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