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Columbia College Chicago
David Trinidad
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David Trinidad

David Trinidad


Associate Professor
- Poetry
Email: dtrinidad@colum.edu

David Trinidad is a member of the Core Poetry Faculty. His most recent books are Dear Prudence: New and Selected Poems (2011), The Late Show (2007), and By Myself (with D.A. Powell, 2009), all published by Turtle Point Press. His other books include Phoebe 2002: An Essay in Verse (Turtle Point, 2003), Plasticville (Turtle Point, 2000, finalist for the Lenore Marshall Poetry Prize of the Academy of American Poets), Answer Song (High Risk/Serpent’s Tail, 1994), Hand Over Heart: Poems 1981-1988 (Amethyst Press, 1991), and Pavane (Sherwood Press, 1981). Prior to coming to Columbia in 2002, Trinidad was a member of the Core Poetry Faculty of the MFA Program in Creative Writing at The New School. He has also taught at Rutgers, Princeton, and Antioch (Los Angeles) universities.

Trinidad is editor of A Fast Life: The Collected Poems of Tim Dlugos (Nightboat Books, 2011), which won a Lambda Literary Award. In addition, he has edited Saints of Hysteria: A Half-Century of Collaborative American Poetry (with Denise Duhamel and Maureen Seaton), Holding Our Own: The Selected Poems of Ann Stanford (with Maxine Scates), and Powerless, the selected poems of Tim Dlugos. His poems have appeared in such periodicals as The American Poetry Review, Boston Review, Harper's, The Paris Review, and Tin House, and have been included in numerous anthologies, including Up Late: American Poetry Since 1970, High Risk: An Anthology of Forbidden Writings, The Best American Poetry, Postmodern American Poetry: A Norton Anthology, and The Outlaw Bible of American Poetry. He received a B.A. from California State University at Northridge and an MFA from Brooklyn College.

Originally from Los Angeles, Trinidad is known for his masterful use of popular culture in his poems. The poet James Schuyler wrote, "Trinidad turns the paste jewels of pop art into the real thing." His work is also associated with the innovative formalism of the New York School. Alice Notley has written, "There is an unwavering light in all of Trinidad's work that turns individual words into objects, new facts." About The Late Show, the New York Times Book Review wrote that Trinidad's "most impressive gift is an ability to dignify the dross of American life, to honor both the shrink-wrapped sentiment of the cultural artifacts he writes about and his own much more complicated emotional response to them."

Trinidad teaches in the undergraduate and graduate poetry programs. He co-edits the journal Court Green and is the faculty advisor for Columbia Poetry Review.